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RANT I need external advice for my future...

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Channing

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Hello Fastlaners,

I am 26 years old and I am in the first year of a bachelor's degree in business administration (I know, it's late, but before I did other things). In this school we do a lot of theory and more than anything else useless things.
Now, also thanks to MJ's books, I have studied by myself the IT sector: more than anything I am learning to program web, and I have bought courses on Udemy, books, etc. And I find it very interesting. In fact, I haven't been in class for two weeks. Oops ... and I don't miss it.
Now the question is this: I was presented with the opportunity to attend another school in September, lasting two years (a degree similar to the bachelor but slightly "inferior", to become a web developer. Profile that I find interesting because yes It would be a very practical school where you learn to program hard.
What do you think dear fasterers? I'm a little in difficulty. I don't know whether to leave university, continue my projects over time that I have available until September and then start that training in IT or continue here where I am.
I do not believe that going out (if all goes well) at school at 29 with only theory in mind is useful. Then soon I will launch my web hosting service..... What should I do?

Thank you!!!!!!!!!

Here you can see the description of this diploma:Screenshot (28).png
 

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LinorCG

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Hello Fastlaners,

I am 26 years old and I am in the first year of a bachelor's degree in business administration (I know, it's late, but before I did other things). In this school we do a lot of theory and more than anything else useless things.
Now, also thanks to MJ's books, I have studied by myself the IT sector: more than anything I am learning to program web, and I have bought courses on Udemy, books, etc. And I find it very interesting. In fact, I haven't been in class for two weeks. Oops ... and I don't miss it.
Now the question is this: I was presented with the opportunity to attend another school in September, lasting two years (a degree similar to the bachelor but slightly "inferior", to become a web developer. Profile that I find interesting because yes It would be a very practical school where you learn to program hard.
What do you think dear fasterers? I'm a little in difficulty. I don't know whether to leave university, continue my projects over time that I have available until September and then start that training in IT or continue here where I am.
I do not believe that going out (if all goes well) at school at 29 with only theory in mind is useful. Then soon I will launch my web hosting service..... What should I do?

Thank you!!!!!!!!!

Here you can see the description of this diploma:View attachment 24265

At the end it will still be your choice.

Firstly, I commend you in taking initiative learning on your own as that is how IT is right now. But personally, coming from an IT background and still currently at IT. The programming, IT subjects, courses that I took before seems to just give me an understanding or baseline on how a system, language, machine, network works and after that, you learn on the fly.

The positions that I was given and we are opening at times is not particularly specific for a language (e.g. JAVA) for example but its a nice-to-have, normally we learn thing when we're on the actual job (with the help of Google, Youtube, udemy, Forums, etc...) that's where you build your experience.

It's hard to have a specialisation as technology changes every year or even faster. So for me, again, this is just from my personal experience...I'd rather go to the floor and get those experiences as soon as possible.
 

NMdad

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I develop software for an ERP accounting system for attorneys, but I'm not a software developer, attorney, or accountant. My degree is in psychology. And I've been self-employed doing this for a bunch of years, making 6 figures. My clients never ask for a resume or certifications.

People only care that you can give them what they want.

My 2 cents: stick with the bachelor's program, and if you want, learn programming on the side via a job (all my training/skills were on-the-job) or by doing projects for yourself or (ideally) having someone else pay you to do things (like build a website).

You're in business school--literally & figuratively. What do you need to learn and do to build a business?
 

Channing

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Read Millionaire Fastlane
Mar 17, 2019
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Lugano, Switzerland
Thank you very much for the advice.
I agree with you that in the end it is the skills and results that count. So if I understand correctly, do you advise me to continue business administration? I believe that it is not ideal because this diverts my concentration from the most important things. let me know. thank you.
 

Channing

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Read Millionaire Fastlane
Mar 17, 2019
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19
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Lugano, Switzerland
At the end it will still be your choice.

Firstly, I commend you in taking initiative learning on your own as that is how IT is right now. But personally, coming from an IT background and still currently at IT. The programming, IT subjects, courses that I took before seems to just give me an understanding or baseline on how a system, language, machine, network works and after that, you learn on the fly.

The positions that I was given and we are opening at times is not particularly specific for a language (e.g. JAVA) for example but its a nice-to-have, normally we learn thing when we're on the actual job (with the help of Google, Youtube, udemy, Forums, etc...) that's where you build your experience.

It's hard to have a specialisation as technology changes every year or even faster. So for me, again, this is just from my personal experience...I'd rather go to the floor and get those experiences as soon as possible.

Thank you very much for the advice.
I understand what you mean, but I live in Europe ... it's always useful to have a title like "cover" to be "respected" ... Do you understand what I mean?
if I understand correctly you advise me to leave school and learn all by myself right?
 

Channing

New Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Mar 17, 2019
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Lugano, Switzerland
I develop software for an ERP accounting system for attorneys, but I'm not a software developer, attorney, or accountant. My degree is in psychology. And I've been self-employed doing this for a bunch of years, making 6 figures. My clients never ask for a resume or certifications.

People only care that you can give them what they want.

My 2 cents: stick with the bachelor's program, and if you want, learn programming on the side via a job (all my training/skills were on-the-job) or by doing projects for yourself or (ideally) having someone else pay you to do things (like build a website).

You're in business school--literally & figuratively. What do you need to learn and do to build a business?

I agree with you that in the end it is the skills and results that count.
So if I understand correctly, do you advise me to continue business administration? I believe that it is not ideal because this diverts my concentration from the most important things. let me know. thank you.
 

Andy Daniels

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So if I understand correctly, do you advise me to continue business administration? I believe that it is not ideal because this diverts my concentration from the most important things. let me know. thank you.

Dude, nobody here is going to tell you what to do.

Everyone needs to make tough decisions for themselves. Succeeding in business is more about acting first and adjusting later.

I understand these decisions involve whether or not to complete years of schooling, but everybody is different, so if you want to do it, then do it.
 

Channing

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Mar 17, 2019
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Lugano, Switzerland
Dude, nobody here is going to tell you what to do.

Everyone needs to make tough decisions for themselves. Succeeding in business is more about acting first and adjusting later.

I understand these decisions involve whether or not to complete years of schooling, but everybody is different, so if you want to do it, then do it.

Dude, thank you for the advice.
I know very well that no one will tell me what to do. I tried to establish a constructive chat in order to evaluate the variables also thanks to opinions external to mine.
 

Ernman

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Welcome to the forum Channing. Tough decision ahead for you. Most of us on the forum have faced similarly challenging decisions, so we don't envy you the angst you're feeling. My advise is going to be biased...I guess everyone's is LOL. I've been a slow laner for many years and only recently - and later in life - discovered there's a different way. I also was able to put my education to work in meaningful ways. Just not well paying ways.

For what it is worth, I recommend you stick with the business degree (but only if you go to class) and learn programming with a side hustle. I'd avoid generic business and see if you can focus on marketing. There's a lot of marketing involved in going fast lane, so your education can be useful. The courses that will teach you how to calculate ROI, IRR, etc, are meaningless for where you want to go in life.

The most important thing is your perspective. Why are you making the choices you'll make? Remember, the fast lane is about processes NOT events. There's nothing wrong with staying in school to get your degree if you understand why and how it will help you achieve a fast lane life. Don't do it as a safety blanket or fall back. You'll risk slipping into that life and never getting out.
 

Channing

New Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Mar 17, 2019
14
19
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Lugano, Switzerland
Welcome to the forum Channing. Tough decision ahead for you. Most of us on the forum have faced similarly challenging decisions, so we don't envy you the angst you're feeling. My advise is going to be biased...I guess everyone's is LOL. I've been a slow laner for many years and only recently - and later in life - discovered there's a different way. I also was able to put my education to work in meaningful ways. Just not well paying ways.

For what it is worth, I recommend you stick with the business degree (but only if you go to class) and learn programming with a side hustle. I'd avoid generic business and see if you can focus on marketing. There's a lot of marketing involved in going fast lane, so your education can be useful. The courses that will teach you how to calculate ROI, IRR, etc, are meaningless for where you want to go in life.

The most important thing is your perspective. Why are you making the choices you'll make? Remember, the fast lane is about processes NOT events. There's nothing wrong with staying in school to get your degree if you understand why and how it will help you achieve a fast lane life. Don't do it as a safety blanket or fall back. You'll risk slipping into that life and never getting out.
THANK YOU very much for the advice.

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srodrigo

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Your decision must come from: what do you really want?

Do you want to run a business, work as a web developer, or both? Depending on that, you can decide whether to carry on with your current degree, drop and become a web dev, or keep doing what you are doing and learn coding on the side.

I'd personally do both. Learning about business administration sounds useful. Learning programming has countless advantages and will have even more in the future. But don't jump from one tech stack to another, pick one and stick to it, otherwise you'll never finish learning and won't get any project done. It doesn't matter which one (although I would personally recommend NodeJS or Python), there are new ones showing up every few years but the old ones are still around (even PHP and Ruby are still in use!).
 

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Channing

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Mar 17, 2019
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Your decision must come from: what do you really want?

Do you want to run a business, work as a web developer, or both? Depending on that, you can decide whether to carry on with your current degree, drop and become a web dev, or keep doing what you are doing and learn coding on the side.

I'd personally do both. Learning about business administration sounds useful. Learning programming has countless advantages and will have even more in the future. But don't jump from one tech stack to another, pick one and stick to it, otherwise you'll never finish learning and won't get any project done. It doesn't matter which one (although I would personally recommend NodeJS or Python), there are new ones showing up every few years but the old ones are still around (even PHP and Ruby are still in use!).

Thank you.
What do I really want? Learn to coding and create a functioning business.
I am more inclined to leave the degree in business administration and become a web developer, and do the IT school, and create a small business online on the side.
True, a degree in business administration sounds useful, but in reality you lose too much time in the theory that in real life is not very useful. In my opinion, the really useful things in a business degree would be summed up in less than 6 months of practical lesson. And honestly I don't feel like throwing my time away just to get the "title" (you could call me Doctor LOL). And then, if I continued my degree, this would divert my concentration from programming.
In my opinion, soft skills are the most important thing, and combined with technical skills are a winning combination.

As languages I'm now at the basics, I'm learning HTML5, CSS3, JAVASCRIPT, and to use bootsrap 4. I'm focusing on the front-end.
Do you think there are too many things I'm trying to learn? I bought the "Complete Web Developer Course 2.0" course by Rob Percival on Udemy (I recommend it - although in my opinion it treats too many topics and not very thorough) and bought two books:
1.HTML & CSS
2.JAVASCRIPT & JQUERY
Both by John Duckett .

Maybe you're right, I'm exaggerating and I should concentrate on fewer things. The question is that to create online businesses you need to know various languages ...
 

srodrigo

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Thank you.
What do I really want? Learn to coding and create a functioning business.
I am more inclined to leave the degree in business administration and become a web developer, and do the IT school, and create a small business online on the side.
True, a degree in business administration sounds useful, but in reality you lose too much time in the theory that in real life is not very useful. In my opinion, the really useful things in a business degree would be summed up in less than 6 months of practical lesson. And honestly I don't feel like throwing my time away just to get the "title" (you could call me Doctor LOL). And then, if I continued my degree, this would divert my concentration from programming.
In my opinion, soft skills are the most important thing, and combined with technical skills are a winning combination.

It sounds like you've already made up your mind.

As languages I'm now at the basics, I'm learning HTML5, CSS3, JAVASCRIPT, and to use bootsrap 4. I'm focusing on the front-end.
Do you think there are too many things I'm trying to learn? I bought the "Complete Web Developer Course 2.0" course by Rob Percival on Udemy (I recommend it - although in my opinion it treats too many topics and not very thorough) and bought two books:
1.HTML & CSS
2.JAVASCRIPT & JQUERY
Both by John Duckett .

I don't know much about frontend courses, I'm sorry that I can't help.

Maybe I'd focus on learning one thing at a time (but not very in-depth yet), and then on how they integrate together. Having a broad overview is ok at the beginning.

Maybe you're right, I'm exaggerating and I should concentrate on fewer things. The question is that to create online businesses you need to know various languages ...

I don't think you necessarily need a lot of tech to create an online business. There are people on this forum making good money with static websites and digital marketing, they probably just know the programming tools you've listed.

First think about what kind of online business you want to create, and then learn the tools you need to build it.
 

advantagecp

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Feb 7, 2015
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Hello Fastlaners,


Now the question is this: I was presented with the opportunity to attend another school in September, lasting two years (a degree similar to the bachelor but slightly "inferior", to become a web developer.

Two years? About 3 years ago, one of my daughters quit a pretty good consulting job and took a 6 month course with Galvanize. She was only two years out of university at that point. She had a job as a web developer lined up before graduation from the course. She has since changed to another company and is making a low 6 figure income. Slow lane, but my point is that you don't need a two year course in order to be a web developer.
 

Channing

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Read Millionaire Fastlane
Mar 17, 2019
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Lugano, Switzerland
Two years? About 3 years ago, one of my daughters quit a pretty good consulting job and took a 6 month course with Galvanize. She was only two years out of university at that point. She had a job as a web developer lined up before graduation from the course. She has since changed to another company and is making a low 6 figure income. Slow lane, but my point is that you don't need a two year course in order to be a web developer.
You are right. Thank you!


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