The Entrepreneur Forum | Startups | Entrepreneurship | Starting a Business | Motivation | Success

I hate when people say this!

Remove ads while supporting the Unscripted philosophy...become an INSIDER.

Twiizlar

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
Mar 4, 2012
343
378
194
24
I was eating lunch with one of my friends. We are both in high school so we were talking about college/careers. He told me he wanted to be a chiropractor. Then i asked him "why?" He told me he wanted to earn a decent living and enjoy his life. He also told me that after 20 years of working a dead end 9-5 he wants to start up a "chiropractor" office. Then he cant retire happily. I asked him why he doesnt want to aim higher with whatever and make more money. He told me he would rather make less money and enjoy his life instead of making more money and working harder/not enjoying life. I HATE when people say this. People automatically assume that more money means more work. This is wrong. Let take into context entrepreneurs. Sure, the first couple of years will be hard. We have to work harder then anyone else. We have to stay up late nights not because we are watching Tv, but because we are thinking of strategies to improve our business. Instead of going to parties or hanging out with friends, we spend our fridays researching our competition. Instead of worrying about when the next hot video game comes out, we worry about our google page rank. It may not even be that hard for some people. But us entrepreneurs have the end goal in our mind. The end goal is to be self-sufficient. It is not about the money. It is about not being controlled by anyone else but ourselves. Our future is not controlled by higher bosses who dont even know our names. It is controlled by ourselves. The thing is if we acknowledge this goal, we are already half way their. We have broke the cycle we have been force fed since birth.

I am currently a senior in high school. I am asian and if we dont go to college we are automatically we failure. We dont make our own dreams to follow. We have certain dreams laid out by our parents (doctor, lawyer) and we have to choose one and learn to like it. Well i am done with this thinking. I have worked my a$$ off throughout high school taking 11 college level classes. Getting A's and B's in all my classes. Staying up all night just to finish my homework. Then came when i had to take the SAT's. I got a 1720 first time without studying. My parents were highly dissapointed. I was also dissapointed in myself. Then the second time i studied super hard for probobly 2 hours a day 7 days a week. The results came back yesterday. I scored a 1620, 100 points lower after studying. My parents are basically done with me and now they are going to watch me all day making sure i do nothing but school and sat work.

I am not going to lie i was skeptical about the entrepreneurship thing. I found this website last year and ever since then i was on and off about whether i wanted to take the risk of entrepreneurship. I have finally decided i will take the risk.

​Sorry this turned into a long rant. I just had to get it off my chest :)
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

MJ DeMarco

Administrator
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jul 23, 2007
30,368
110,165
3,751
Fountain Hills, AZ
I am asian and if we dont go to college we are automatically we failure. We dont make our own dreams to follow. We have certain dreams laid out by our parents (doctor, lawyer) and we have to choose one and learn to like it. Well i am done with this thinking. I have worked my a$$ off throughout high school taking 11 college level classes. Getting A's and B's in all my classes. Staying up all night just to finish my homework. Then came when i had to take the SAT's. I got a 1720 first time without studying. My parents were highly dissapointed. I was also dissapointed in myself. Then the second time i studied super hard for probobly 2 hours a day 7 days a week.
I hear this a lot within Asian culture. IMO, an Asian entrepreneur needs to write a book on how to break free from cultural/parental expectations. There's definitely a need for it. This is the umpteenth time this has been mentioned here with respect to the Asian parents demanding their child become doctor/lawyer/engineer.
 

maui

Banned
Oct 16, 2013
33
26
55
Northern Virginia
I hear this a lot within Asian culture. IMO, an Asian entrepreneur needs to write a book on how to break free from cultural/parental expectations. There's definitely a need for it. This is the umpteenth time this has been mentioned here with respect to the Asian parents demanding their child become doctor/lawyer/engineer.
I am Asian. And yes, this is soooo prevalent in the Asian culture. My father's a doctor. My brother and I became engineers. My sister became a doctor. You should have seen the hissy fit my parents threw when I quit my engineering job and became a real estate agent. They really thought I was throwing my life away. I just view the real estate thing as a stepping stone to something better, and in the process, also pick up a couple of investment properties. :D It took them a long time to accept the real estate thing. I can't tell them what else I'm looking into (I believe it will ultimately be software, but my own company, not working for someone else) because they view everything that's not a job as a risk. And yet, 2 of my engineer friends got laid off this year.
 
S

stranger

Guest
He told me he would rather make less money and enjoy his life instead of making more money and working harder/not enjoying life.
He's right. Sorry, but it's something wrong with you if you hate when people say this.
 

Breaking Free

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
Aug 4, 2013
274
275
110
Phoenix, AZ
There's a difference between people who say they want the slowlane versus people who say that the fastlane is wrong.

I know several people who are happy (or at least content) in the slowlane. It bugs me only when they say my ideals are somehow "wrong" because it's not their way of life.
 
S

stranger

Guest
I hear this a lot within Asian culture. IMO, an Asian entrepreneur needs to write a book on how to break free from cultural/parental expectations. There's definitely a need for it. This is the umpteenth time this has been mentioned here with respect to the Asian parents demanding their child become doctor/lawyer/engineer.
Who will do an outsourcing job for the USA entrepreneurs in this case.:D

OK, I'm kidding.:rolleyes:
 
D

DeletedUser2

Guest
People automatically assume that more money means more work.
working within they only model people know about, this is very true.

Unless you learn a different model, you are going to run across this from 98% of people.

how do you make more money?
work more hours.

until you can learn to leverage, people, or systems. this will always be true.

start learning the models for success. instead of trying to get an education, to get a job, that will simply pay you more per hour you work,

learn how to listen to peoples pain, (MJ JUST POSTED ONE, IF YOU NOTICED)



IMO, an Asian entrepreneur needs to write a book on how to break free from cultural/parental expectations. There's definitely a need for it.
THIS is an example. interview a bunch of Asian entrepreneurs, and post a book, Breaking free Asia!

write that book, or do a series of podcasts, or something that addresses this. I SEE it all the time. too.
school is the only way out. but I have found that if you were to work as hard on a business, as you do studying, you would have the chance for making far more money then those that dream of accounting.

Good luck

Z
 

Kak

Legendary Contributor
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Jan 23, 2011
6,253
27,141
4,554
I agree with him..
I feel like you pulled that out of the OPs context. LOL

I also agree with the friend. I enjoy entrepreneurship making less or more, it is a better way to live my life.
 

JEdwards

Silver Contributor
Speedway Pass
Jan 16, 2011
1,343
647
100
Texas
I feel like you pulled that out of the OPs context. LOL

I also agree with the friend. I enjoy entrepreneurship making less or more, it is a better way to live my life.
I did slant it a little. I love what I do, I have been offered many deals that would of made a lot of money that I didnt take cause it was not something I wanted - interested to do. I only do what I want. Sometimes I have made much less money from that decision.
 

craig1928

Silver Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
Jul 31, 2012
311
501
250
Dublin, Ireland
So the stereotype is true

High_Expectaitions_Asian_Father.jpg
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

OP
OP
Twiizlar

Twiizlar

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
Mar 4, 2012
343
378
194
24
He's right. Sorry, but it's something wrong with you if you hate when people say this.
ok those 2 lines arnt what i was saying. I meant when people think that the only way to become rich is to work countless hours and not enjoy life or be extremely lucky. That was just an example..
 

mimedia

Contributor
Jun 25, 2013
23
68
113
He's right. Sorry, but it's something wrong with you if you hate when people say this.
The statement that "its better to make less money and enjoy life than to work harder and be miserable" is true if you take it at face value, but in the context that the OP is talking about it - the statement is a false dichotomy used to rationalize wage slavery. Entrepreneurship can involve less work in the long run, and more time to enjoy life, so how is the statement relevant?

I think what the OP is getting at is that most actually people actually use this as an excuse to rationalize taking the safe comfortable route with no risk of failure. What they're really saying is "I'd rather sacrifice a lifetime of freedom and take a comfortable salary and endure a lifetime of wage slavery if it means I get 2 weeks of vacation a year (3 weeks when I put in my 10 years!) and I don't have to face the fear of failure."

If you told most people that they have a choice of working 80-90 hour weeks for 4-7 years and then doing whatever they want for the rest of their life, or working 50 hour weeks for the next 45 years - pretty much everyone would choose the former. But throw in a little risk and a murky path, and the whole equation changes...
 
OP
OP
Twiizlar

Twiizlar

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
Mar 4, 2012
343
378
194
24
The statement that "its better to make less money and enjoy life than to work harder and be miserable" is true if you take it at face value, but in the context that the OP is talking about it - the statement is a false dichotomy used to rationalize wage slavery. Entrepreneurship can involve less work in the long run, and more time to enjoy life, so how is the statement relevant?

I think what the OP is getting at is that most actually people actually use this as an excuse to rationalize taking the safe comfortable route with no risk of failure. What they're really saying is "I'd rather sacrifice a lifetime of freedom and take a comfortable salary and endure a lifetime of wage slavery if it means I get 2 weeks of vacation a year (3 weeks when I put in my 10 years!) and I don't have to face the fear of failure."

If you told most people that they have a choice of working 80-90 hour weeks for 4-7 years and then doing whatever they want for the rest of their life, or working 50 hour weeks for the next 45 years - pretty much everyone would choose the former. But throw in a little risk and a murky path, and the whole equation changes...
this is exactly what im saying. thank you
 

regoapps

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
Sep 19, 2012
35
191
134
I'm an Asian entrepreneur who's somewhat successful. Here's my two cents.

The statement should be changed to: It's better to work harder now, so that you can relax for the rest of your life.

I had strict Asian parents. No video games, and no TV except on weekends. And even on weekends, they only allowed me to watch TV/play video games for 2 hours... per week. I hated the rules. But I learned to respect it. The strict rules kept me from wasting time doing unproductive things. I spent the extra time learning how to code and making websites, which later paid off (more on this later).

They used to push me to do things I didn't like. For example, they wanted me to learn how to play piano, even though I wasn't that interested in it. So I spent years learning how to play an instrument I didn't have that much of an interest in. I was really good at it, but just wasn't interested. I later stopped playing, and eventually had forgotten how to play altogether. What a waste of my time. But I did learn some things out of it. I learned to never pursue a career that I didn't love. I learned that choosing to be a doctor or lawyer would not be for me if I didn't actually enjoy it (no matter how good I would have been at it). I also learned about dedication to the task at hand and never giving up even if it's tedious. Simply doing the things you love doesn't mean that there's no hard work involved. I didn't get to become a great pianist without the 2 hours of practice every night. I learned that with practice, you could be good at pretty much anything you set your mind to... even making money.

Despite my father being a doctor (herbalist to be exact), he and my mother never pressured me to pursue a career I didn't want. They heard stories about how Asian kids were committing suicide or going crazy because of the pressure their parents put on them. They instead wanted me to learn how to pressure myself. And that's exactly what I did. I put the pressure on myself to become successful. And that's really where your mindset comes into play. If you can discipline yourself and put down the XBOX controller and instead pick up a book or play around with whatever you're trying to do, then you're at step 1 to becoming successful. And it's significantly easier if you're the one pressuring yourself to stay focused instead of someone else telling you to stay focused. Because, 1) that person is not always around to pressure you, and 2) you have to associate working hard with a reward instead of with a punishment. I used to see studying and doing homework as punishment and taking away time from having fun. But now, I study and work because I'm learning, and I relate learning with becoming more successful. Now I see having fun as taking time away from being successful haha (sad side effect of having an entrepreneurial mindset).

And some people might say, "Well I rather play XBOX and work less than work hard and be miserable." Guess what. The hard work doesn't have to last a lifetime. I'm still in my 20s now and not miserable at all. My work schedule went down from 80 hours per week (had a full time job as a web developer/programmer and coded apps on the side) to now just 1 hour or less per week. Some days I have bursts of work (like two weeks ago, I spent 48 hours straight just coding). But they are all by choice now. I get to work whenever I feel like it. And that's really the greatest pleasure of being a successful entrepreneur. Having no more alarm clocks and no more stress of deadlines and office politics is pretty much the best gift you can get (besides the money).
 

Daniel A

DIESEL
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Jun 20, 2013
944
1,098
391
California, USA
I agree with him..
I do too. There is a certain point where I would like to relax and enjoy life more. There's a thread here about a book an ultra-wealthy guy wrote, Dan Pena (look it up if you have not read the thread yet). There are a lot of sacrifices to be made and it's not worth spending your entire life doing whatever it takes to just earn more and more money...when at a certain point, it doesn't seem to do much else good.

Specifically on the guy wanting to go the slower chiropractor route, if he is really enjoying life that way, good for him. That's what really counts.

Why can't he start his own office sooner though? Why wait 20 years? That's more than double his age I bet and it's another lifetime for my current age lol. If he starts his own sooner he can get into investing sooner most likely! I don't get the 20 years part.

He is probably a really relaxed guy huh...in my mind I imagine chiropractors as very relaxed people lol.

If he has peace of mind, is making good money, enjoying life and helping people...I can't argue against that really.
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
Twiizlar

Twiizlar

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
Mar 4, 2012
343
378
194
24
I do too. There is a certain point where I would like to relax and enjoy life more. There's a thread here about a book an ultra-wealthy guy wrote, Dan Pena (look it up if you have not read the thread yet). There are a lot of sacrifices to be made and it's not worth spending your entire life doing whatever it takes to just earn more and more money...when at a certain point, it doesn't seem to do much else good.

Specifically on the guy wanting to go the slower chiropractor route, if he is really enjoying life that way, good for him. That's what really counts.

Why can't he start his own office sooner though? Why wait 20 years? That's more than double his age I bet and it's another lifetime for my current age lol. If he starts his own sooner he can get into investing sooner most likely! I don't get the 20 years part.

He is probably a really relaxed guy huh...in my mind I imagine chiropractors as very relaxed people lol.

If he has peace of mind, is making good money, enjoying life and helping people...I can't argue against that really.
Did you even read my original post? I'm not saying there is something wrong with making an honest livin and being happy. I am talking about the thinking that the way to become rich is a scary and you have to grind and work countless hours. (For example the only way my friend knows how to become rich realistically is work in a company for a long time and move up slowly)
 

Vick

Legendary Contributor
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
Dec 27, 2012
1,436
6,750
1,746
39
Toronto
I'm an Asian entrepreneur who's somewhat successful. Here's my two cents.

The statement should be changed to: It's better to work harder now, so that you can relax for the rest of your life.

I had strict Asian parents. No video games, and no TV except on weekends. And even on weekends, they only allowed me to watch TV/play video games for 2 hours... per week. I hated the rules. But I learned to respect it. The strict rules kept me from wasting time doing unproductive things. I spent the extra time learning how to code and making websites, which later paid off (more on this later).

They used to push me to do things I didn't like. For example, they wanted me to learn how to play piano, even though I wasn't that interested in it. So I spent years learning how to play an instrument I didn't have that much of an interest in. I was really good at it, but just wasn't interested. I later stopped playing, and eventually had forgotten how to play altogether. What a waste of my time. But I did learn some things out of it. I learned to never pursue a career that I didn't love. I learned that choosing to be a doctor or lawyer would not be for me if I didn't actually enjoy it (no matter how good I would have been at it). I also learned about dedication to the task at hand and never giving up even if it's tedious. Simply doing the things you love doesn't mean that there's no hard work involved. I didn't get to become a great pianist without the 2 hours of practice every night. I learned that with practice, you could be good at pretty much anything you set your mind to... even making money.

Despite my father being a doctor (herbalist to be exact), he and my mother never pressured me to pursue a career I didn't want. They heard stories about how Asian kids were committing suicide or going crazy because of the pressure their parents put on them. They instead wanted me to learn how to pressure myself. And that's exactly what I did. I put the pressure on myself to become successful. And that's really where your mindset comes into play. If you can discipline yourself and put down the XBOX controller and instead pick up a book or play around with whatever you're trying to do, then you're at step 1 to becoming successful. And it's significantly easier if you're the one pressuring yourself to stay focused instead of someone else telling you to stay focused. Because, 1) that person is not always around to pressure you, and 2) you have to associate working hard with a reward instead of with a punishment. I used to see studying and doing homework as punishment and taking away time from having fun. But now, I study and work because I'm learning, and I relate learning with becoming more successful. Now I see having fun as taking time away from being successful haha (sad side effect of having an entrepreneurial mindset).

And some people might say, "Well I rather play XBOX and work less than work hard and be miserable." Guess what. The hard work doesn't have to last a lifetime. I'm still in my 20s now and not miserable at all. My work schedule went down from 80 hours per week (had a full time job as a web developer/programmer and coded apps on the side) to now just 1 hour or less per week. Some days I have bursts of work (like two weeks ago, I spent 48 hours straight just coding). But they are all by choice now. I get to work whenever I feel like it. And that's really the greatest pleasure of being a successful entrepreneur. Having no more alarm clocks and no more stress of deadlines and office politics is pretty much the best gift you can get (besides the money).
Well said!
 

Worldisyours

Bronze Contributor
Oct 20, 2013
260
213
118
I agree with him..

He is right to some extent. When you go big, you have be an excellent problem solver in everything. relationships, business troubleshooting,filling the gaps. In addition, you have to deal with resistance, and that is the people around you. To be successful you have to adopt immunity to resistance because you will get it 24/7.

You are already on your journey, you are experiencing exterior resistance to your ambitions and ideas from your friend. The bigger you get the more resistance you deal with.

At first, you deal will it and pull through, and then when reach a certain level of growth, you develop a system to adsorb it and wash it away, like a sponge.

Your reaction shows that you are at the starting phase. The more resistance you deal and adapt to, the more successful you can become
 

Daniel A

DIESEL
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Jun 20, 2013
944
1,098
391
California, USA
Did you even read my original post? I'm not saying there is something wrong with making an honest livin and being happy. I am talking about the thinking that the way to become rich is a scary and you have to grind and work countless hours. (For example the only way my friend knows how to become rich realistically is work in a company for a long time and move up slowly)
I read it apparently around 1:30 AM so I didn't have as clear of a mind like I do now haha

In that case I see what you are saying.

That's the only way he knows or believes? If he only knows that path then damn...try and get him to read TMF. I've tried telling others to read it before but they didn't. I also try to explain to people (family included) but they are just unable to see past a job.

So because of all that, I'm not an evangelist anymore haha. I like to point people to third-party resources now...and if they don't even look into them...I won't bother trying to convince them actively. The best way to do it successfully then is lead by example. Pulling them in and getting them curious. That might take some time though haha.

Most people are really just too careful, too scared and won't take risks...in life overall. That stuff used to annoy me too but I just accept now.

IDK if you can get your parents to understand either. I'd point them to Robert Kiyosaki. He's Asian and had the super academic dad. They might be open to reading his book because of that.
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

Tony I

Bronze Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Apr 9, 2013
207
436
219
MA
I'm an Asian entrepreneur who's somewhat successful. Here's my two cents.

The statement should be changed to: It's better to work harder now, so that you can relax for the rest of your life.

I had strict Asian parents. No video games, and no TV except on weekends. And even on weekends, they only allowed me to watch TV/play video games for 2 hours... per week. I hated the rules. But I learned to respect it. The strict rules kept me from wasting time doing unproductive things. I spent the extra time learning how to code and making websites, which later paid off (more on this later).

They used to push me to do things I didn't like. For example, they wanted me to learn how to play piano, even though I wasn't that interested in it. So I spent years learning how to play an instrument I didn't have that much of an interest in. I was really good at it, but just wasn't interested. I later stopped playing, and eventually had forgotten how to play altogether. What a waste of my time. But I did learn some things out of it. I learned to never pursue a career that I didn't love. I learned that choosing to be a doctor or lawyer would not be for me if I didn't actually enjoy it (no matter how good I would have been at it). I also learned about dedication to the task at hand and never giving up even if it's tedious. Simply doing the things you love doesn't mean that there's no hard work involved. I didn't get to become a great pianist without the 2 hours of practice every night. I learned that with practice, you could be good at pretty much anything you set your mind to... even making money.

Despite my father being a doctor (herbalist to be exact), he and my mother never pressured me to pursue a career I didn't want. They heard stories about how Asian kids were committing suicide or going crazy because of the pressure their parents put on them. They instead wanted me to learn how to pressure myself. And that's exactly what I did. I put the pressure on myself to become successful. And that's really where your mindset comes into play. If you can discipline yourself and put down the XBOX controller and instead pick up a book or play around with whatever you're trying to do, then you're at step 1 to becoming successful. And it's significantly easier if you're the one pressuring yourself to stay focused instead of someone else telling you to stay focused. Because, 1) that person is not always around to pressure you, and 2) you have to associate working hard with a reward instead of with a punishment. I used to see studying and doing homework as punishment and taking away time from having fun. But now, I study and work because I'm learning, and I relate learning with becoming more successful. Now I see having fun as taking time away from being successful haha (sad side effect of having an entrepreneurial mindset).

And some people might say, "Well I rather play XBOX and work less than work hard and be miserable." Guess what. The hard work doesn't have to last a lifetime. I'm still in my 20s now and not miserable at all. My work schedule went down from 80 hours per week (had a full time job as a web developer/programmer and coded apps on the side) to now just 1 hour or less per week. Some days I have bursts of work (like two weeks ago, I spent 48 hours straight just coding). But they are all by choice now. I get to work whenever I feel like it. And that's really the greatest pleasure of being a successful entrepreneur. Having no more alarm clocks and no more stress of deadlines and office politics is pretty much the best gift you can get (besides the money).

Great post Allen. Hope to see you around here more often.
 

The-J

Dog Dad
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Summit Attendee
Speedway Pass
Aug 28, 2011
3,675
8,856
1,966
Ontario
I got a 1720 first time without studying. My parents were highly dissapointed. I was also dissapointed in myself. Then the second time i studied super hard for probobly 2 hours a day 7 days a week. The results came back yesterday. I scored a 1620, 100 points lower after studying. My parents are basically done with me and now they are going to watch me all day making sure i do nothing but school and sat work.
I'd be disappointed too if I scored that low.

I'm kidding. But I've been in a similar position. I was raised in a strict environment, as well. I wasn't allowed to go out as a kid. I was pressured to go to a good school, get good grades, and all that jazz.

I got the grades. Did well on my SATs. Got into a good school.

I left that school, left the country, and now I'm not even in school. Why? I'm currently working on a business, making money, doing my own thing. And you know what? I wouldn't have it any other way.

My parents are still not happy about my decision. But, as it stands right now, they don't pay my bills so they can't say or do SHIT about it. I love em to death but I do me, they can do them.

If your parents have to disown you until you succeed, then that's what has to happen.

A pro-tip for you: don't tell them. Don't make a big proclamation about your dreams and ambitions and shit. They'll laugh at you and say 'How can you hope to do that when you are so lazy?' Once you graduate, dude, you gotta be independent. Gone are the days where the kid stays at home until marriage.

Shit's different now. I don't think your parents understand that. But that's okay. Come back to them in 10 years and buy your dad a new Ferrari and your mom a beautiful Tiffany necklace. Pay off their house. Then casually remind them of the path they never suggested for you.

p.s. you think high school was hard? Shit gets a lot tougher.

p.p.s read my blog on this website. I have 97 entries and it chronicles my evolution from full retard to slightly less retarded. You're a senior in high school, so it starts with me being 1 year from your current position. Hopefully it will be of help to you.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

formynextsong

New Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Oct 21, 2013
19
1
15
I was eating lunch with one of my friends. We are both in high school so we were talking about college/careers. He told me he wanted to be a chiropractor. Then i asked him "why?" He told me he wanted to earn a decent living and enjoy his life. He also told me that after 20 years of working a dead end 9-5 he wants to start up a "chiropractor" office. Then he cant retire happily. I asked him why he doesnt want to aim higher with whatever and make more money. He told me he would rather make less money and enjoy his life instead of making more money and working harder/not enjoying life. I HATE when people say this. People automatically assume that more money means more work. This is wrong. Let take into context entrepreneurs. Sure, the first couple of years will be hard. We have to work harder then anyone else. We have to stay up late nights not because we are watching Tv, but because we are thinking of strategies to improve our business. Instead of going to parties or hanging out with friends, we spend our fridays researching our competition. Instead of worrying about when the next hot video game comes out, we worry about our google page rank. It may not even be that hard for some people. But us entrepreneurs have the end goal in our mind. The end goal is to be self-sufficient. It is not about the money. It is about not being controlled by anyone else but ourselves. Our future is not controlled by higher bosses who dont even know our names. It is controlled by ourselves. The thing is if we acknowledge this goal, we are already half way their. We have broke the cycle we have been force fed since birth.

...
I am not going to lie i was skeptical about the entrepreneurship thing. I found this website last year and ever since then i was on and off about whether i wanted to take the risk of entrepreneurship. I have finally decided i will take the risk.

​Sorry this turned into a long rant. I just had to get it off my chest :)

I might be a little biased here, but here goes...

I have been sick for years due to mold exposure in previous homes, and I searched high and low for someone - anyone - in the conventional medical field who could help me. I went to ENT docs for sinus infecton issues, I went to docs who told me it was all in my head, I dealt with so much crap that I had almost given up until I found a kind chiropractor who actually understood and wanted to help - he actually had a clue. From my experience, many chiropractors know SO much more about true health and how to keep it than the mainstream docs ever did, especially in the area of diet. So I guess what I'm saying is your friend could have chosen a much worse occupation than wanting to be a chiropractor.

That said, I agree with the previous posters that your friend is thinking and 'speaking Slowlane'. You know, for those of us who are Fastlane-minded (speak Fastlane), being surrounded by those who only strive to be employees is not such a bad thing, because we need good employees for our businesses as well. If everyone wanted to be the boss we would be in trouble, right? The reason your friend thinks more money means more work is that he is not seeing the concept of leverage or Fastlane at all, but rather he is seeing life through an employee set of glasses - and to him making more money indeed does only involve trading more of his time for money. Some people are truly cool with staying like that, and while that is probably not true for any of us here it doesn't mean that he is necessarily wrong.

Still, I personally believe that although money can be a motivating factor (due to need to survive) as well as the need to be financially independent, the most important part of the equation should be wanting to give something - wanting to create value in the world. I also personally think that retirement per se shouldn't be the biggest goal, being free enough to do more in the world (including taking better care of your family) should. I don't want to retire so I can sit around all day and only buy expensive things - not that there is anything wrong with expensive things - but I want to be free financially so I can GIVE more to the world. I don't believe that retirement should be lying around doing nothing everyday and totally living for self, but rather enjoying one's freedom WHILE still contributing something to society.

Also, more money can still mean more work even in an striving-to-be-entrepreneur situation if you have basically just bought yourself a job while you are 'self-employed' (aka Kiyosaki's ESBI model). I agree with your underlying idea though that if done right, a Fastlane path *can* be less work with more money later but is a lot of work at the beginning.

I also agree that there is a need for a book that addresses the Asian perfectionism.:thumbsup:
 

EasyMoney_in_NC

Contributor
Sep 9, 2007
399
31
31
Wilmington NC
I'd like to represent that I'm not Asian, nor do I play one on TV. I also did not attend college. I found something that made me money (well a couple of things), went hog wild for five years or so. Now I have everything I need and then some. I'm not a multi millionaire or anything, but I'm very comfy. I still have a business that I am married to, but only because I'm a control freak. I (usually) have free time, do things I like to do and am hopefully set up for life at 43.
I think that whole idea of "I'm ok making less money if I lead a happy life" is a load of crap! Bust a$$, take a little risk, stick your neck out there for a bit (all calculated moves of course) and do something good for yourself. Not to get political but Obama is going to, or maybe has fundamentally changed our country, in my opinion, not for the good. A bit of work, luck, and creative tax management is what will be required to make it through the next 25 years in this country. Get ready for Socialism and high costs of everything (like Europe)......it's coming. Having a business for no money is crazy...........go get a job you can forget about at 5pm. Business ownership is a blessing and a huge curse, making "less or little" money is just stupid. It validates being mediocre.
 
OP
OP
Twiizlar

Twiizlar

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
Mar 4, 2012
343
378
194
24
I'd like to represent that I'm not Asian, nor do I play one on TV. I also did not attend college. I found something that made me money (well a couple of things), went hog wild for five years or so. Now I have everything I need and then some. I'm not a multi millionaire or anything, but I'm very comfy. I still have a business that I am married to, but only because I'm a control freak. I (usually) have free time, do things I like to do and am hopefully set up for life at 43.
I think that whole idea of "I'm ok making less money if I lead a happy life" is a load of crap! Bust a$$, take a little risk, stick your neck out there for a bit (all calculated moves of course) and do something good for yourself. Not to get political but Obama is going to, or maybe has fundamentally changed our country, in my opinion, not for the good. A bit of work, luck, and creative tax management is what will be required to make it through the next 25 years in this country. Get ready for Socialism and high costs of everything (like Europe)......it's coming. Having a business for no money is crazy...........go get a job you can forget about at 5pm. Business ownership is a blessing and a huge curse, making "less or little" money is just stupid. It validates being mediocre.
Yessss. Finally someone gets it
 
OP
OP
Twiizlar

Twiizlar

Bronze Contributor
Speedway Pass
Mar 4, 2012
343
378
194
24
I'm impressed that at 17, you recognize. Bravo, you'll go far!
Thanks for the kind words. This is why i see the world in a different way than my friends. I dont plan on telling my friends anything because they simply wont get it. They wont get why i work countless hours on a website and push off social things. They wont get why i dont want to go to college (even though my parents will make me haha), and they wont get why i love education but hate school. I guess i have to wait until my business takes off. Since im still 17 i have to factor in my parents and this fastlane stuff gets tough. This is the time when i should be applying to college and that extra pressure is exerted on me by my parents. I will just have to push through it and do what is best for me
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Sponsored Offers

  • Sticky
FEATURED! Introducing... WEALTH EXPO$ED, A Short Story By MJ DeMarco
Ah, I should've checked here to find out that it was free! Although, Amazon only charged $2 for...
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE Fox's Web Design Guide: Earn $100K this year (Yes, 2020!) and Go Fastlane
Is it still available to send the application, your story is impressive, time to act. Ya this...
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE Lex DeVille's - Advanced Freelance Udemy Courses!
Pick the one you need most. Some just buy them all. :D Loving your email sequence.
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE You Are One Call Away From Living Your Dream Life - LightHouse’s Accountability Program ⚡
Dropping a quick note in here to say... if you are on TFL, you are part of an elite group of...
  • Sticky
MARKETPLACE Kill Bigger Incubator
I joined @Kak's business incubator in the first week of May. During our daily chats we uncovered...


Visit A Forum Sponsor
sponsor

New Topics

Fastlane Insiders

View the forum AD FREE.
Private, unindexed content
Detailed process/execution threads
Monthly conference calls with doers
Ideas needing execution, more!

Join Fastlane Insiders.

Top Bottom
AdBlock Detected - Please Disable

Yes, ads can be annoying. But please...

...to support the Unscripted/Fastlane mission (and to respect the immense amount of time needed to manage this forum) please DISABLE your ad-block. Thank you.

I've Disabled AdBlock