The Entrepreneur Forum | Startups | Entrepreneurship | Starting a Business | Motivation | Success
  • NOTICE! If you received MULTIPLE EMAILS from the forum today, please be advised that our monthly email system got caught in a loop and inadvertently might have sent you several emails. The problem has since been fixed and all Unsubscribe Requests will be processed within 24 hours.
  • It's back! As an INSIDER you can now SORT any thread by LIKES. See this post for more info.
  • Join 50,000+ entrepreneurs who are earning their freedom and living their dream.

    "Fastlane" is an entrepreneur discussion forum based on The C.E.N.T.S Framework outlined in the two best-selling books by MJ DeMarco (The Millionaire Fastlane and UNSCRIPTED®). From multimillionaires to digital nomads to side hustlers who are grinding a job, the Fastlane Forum features real entrepreneurs creating real businesses with one goal in mind: Freedom— both financial and temporal.

    Download (Unscripted) Download (Millionaire Fastlane) Register
    Registering for the forum removes this block.

EXECUTION Growing a new YouTube channel

Timmy C

I Will Not Stop!
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
I've Read UNSCRIPTED
Speedway Pass
Jun 12, 2018
880
1,805
549
Melbourne, Australia
Well me personally I am just uploading to YouTube for practice, as I am producing video courses and cooking classes right now. so I'm just using it to improve my skills and get in the habit of producing more, and refining my process for the courses I create.

YouTube channel hasn't bought me in anything but that isn't my goal for putting content up on the platform, I honestly don't care if I get many views.

Could my time be better spend on better activities that produce higher revenue? I would say undoubtedly that's probably the case, so while I have been doing this, I have been learning more about the world of importing by reading some books by Walter hay, (your threads) and seeing what products are out there where a potential opportunity may lie.
 

Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum. Subscribe.

  • Thread starter
  • Moderator
  • #32
OP
OP
Andy Black

Andy Black

Any colour, as long as it's red.
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
May 20, 2014
8,544
36,243
4,306
Ireland
For those of you with Youtube channels: WHY?
Why video?
  • Not many people are doing video compared to written content.
  • Even less are doing video well.
  • Video forces you to get over yourself.
  • Do a good video first and audio and written content can be extracted from it.
  • Video can be more engaging to consume because more of our senses are used.
  • Video is getting easier to consume due to improving technology and faster broadband.
  • If you’re selling a video course then it makes sense to use video content to market and sell it.
  • If people are to know, like, and trust you then they’ll do it much quicker if they can see you and hear you talk.
  • YouTube videos can rank on Google.
  • A YouTube video on a written post can help that page rank on Google.
  • It feels a bit like where Superman’s dad records all his life lessons so his son can view them when the time is right. I’ve three sons (7, 9, 11). One day they might go through the videos I create and get some value from them. Video messages are quite a way to create a legacy.

Why YouTube?
  • YouTube is the second biggest search engine in the world.
  • YouTube has a similar number of active users as Facebook.
  • People spend a similar amount of time per day on YouTube as Facebook.
  • More and more people are watching video on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, etc - instead of watching TV.
  • People go to YouTube to watch videos. They don’t go to Facebook to watch videos. On Facebook video sound is off by default because there’d be uproar otherwise. On YouTube sound defaults to OFF on my mobile, but defaults to ON on my desktop. A sign that people are on YouTube to consume videos (which seems a Duh statement but I’m just pointing out that people don’t go to Facebook primarily to watch videos).
  • Videos on Facebook fall off the feed and disappear. Videos on YouTube can stay bringing in views and subscribers (and helping people!) for years to come.
  • Many people go to YouTube to learn how to do something. Many of those people could be, or could soon be, in the market for a paid course on that subject.
  • YouTube ads can boost a video and help it rank organically.
  • YouTube Ads are created in the Google Ads interface - good if you already know Google Ads.
  • There’s lots of businesses that want help growing their YouTube channel, and are prepared to pay for it.
  • Video is expensive. Businesses looking to get DFY services are already in the mindset that it won’t be cheap.
  • I had a play on Instagram and didn’t like it, I’m still playing on Facebook and am undecided, but find myself fascinated by YouTube.

Whenever I click on someone's channel, there's typically a couple thousand views per video or less. Is that really worth your time?
I’m delighted when *one* person replies saying something I pointed them to helped them. I consider that worth my time.

If I “can” it and it helps more people over the years then that’s even better.

By capturing and publishing that advice, I can point people towards it in future and not repeat myself. This saves me a lot of time, and increases the number of people I can help.

If a couple of thousand views equates to helping a couple of thousand people then that is a-m-a-z-i-n-g.


Is the effort you put into maintaining your channel worth more than if you did other forms of marketing and sales?
I can’t NOT produce content. I do it daily, mostly answering questions. I may as well do it in such a way that it’s accessible and available to more people, and where the audio and written version can be simply extracted from it.

Producing content and answering questions IS my number one form of marketing and sales.


And before everyone gets all defensive, answer this: How much money has your channel brought in for YOU to date, and what's that come out to per hour of effort that you spent (learning how to publish, editing, creating the content, etc.)
I don’t know. My current Youtube channel is just a store to house content that I link to in TFLF threads. The new channel will be more focused and with the intention of getting found and known by people outside the forum.

I’ve sold my course nearly 100 times purely by releasing it into the forum. Even a few people outside the forum bought it due to word of mouth referrals.

It was bringing in about $1k/mth revenue for the first 18 months (it’s dropped off a bit since then). I know people making $1k/day revenue from selling a similarly priced course. I’m now curious what would happen if I intentionally sold my course, outside the forum.


I'm sure it could be effective, but I believe for the vast majority of people it's a waste of time - time that could be better allocated into higher revenue producing activities.
Maybe so. Although I’m not so interested in the common result.

It’s an interesting hobby to have though, and it forces us to get better at creating content, presenting, and getting over ourselves. My hat is off to anyone having a go at creating a YouTube channel.

It’s damn uncomfortable doing video, so being the contrarian I’m attracted to it even just because of that.


I remember Andrew once writing somewhere in the forum:

“What’s the best that can happen?”
 

Josh Schmitt

New Contributor
Aug 1, 2017
5
7
16
22
Chicago, IL
I like your bottom-line perspective, and it's a good questionFor YouTube, it's a long-term strategy to create a brand & have an established page on a platform that more and more people are using, as opposed to other educational & entertaining platforms. Thus, building a high-fidelity rapport with customers (so to work, it depends on the business model & the biz's relationship w it's customers)
 

Josh Schmitt

New Contributor
Aug 1, 2017
5
7
16
22
Chicago, IL
I've got me a YouTube coach, and I'm in a small group learning to grow our YouTube channels.

I'll not link to the new channel for the moment because I want to see if I can grow it from scratch.

Anyway... I just created a quick video where I'm practicing doing talking head videos by, err, giving tips on creating talking head videos. It's on my normal channel, not the new one I'll create.

View: https://youtu.be/ixkvYao2zuk


Here’s the tripod selfie stick I used. It’s super cheap, portable, and simple.

Cheers! Also creating YouTube content :) what small group do you participate in? Is it online - I'd love to take part and collaborate also
 
  • Thread starter
  • Moderator
  • #35
OP
OP
Andy Black

Andy Black

Any colour, as long as it's red.
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
May 20, 2014
8,544
36,243
4,306
Ireland
Cheers! Also creating YouTube content :) what small group do you participate in? Is it online - I'd love to take part and collaborate also
It's a group of students for that coach. It's not very active because we're all (supposed to be) creating our videos at the moment. I've fallen behind and need to catch up.

We have this thread and Fox's where we could interact and help each other?
 
  • Thread starter
  • Moderator
  • #36
OP
OP
Andy Black

Andy Black

Any colour, as long as it's red.
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
May 20, 2014
8,544
36,243
4,306
Ireland
Saving this from @lowtek

+1 on the YouTube enigma machine.

My earliest videos have average view duration around 2 - 3 minutes, and click through rates of 3 - 6%. This is due in large part to having shorter videos and lackluster thumbnails.

More recent videos have average view duration 4 - 6 minutes, about double, with comparable click through rates (I still suck at thumbnails).

YouTube STILL pushes the older videos. They are often among my top 5 of the last 48 hours, despite being significantly worse than newer stuff. The majority of my top 10 are the new stuff, so I'm growing much faster than in the beginning, but it just highlights my confusion around the algorithm.

Our channels are of comparable size (I just hit 3500 subs today), so perhaps some of these tips will be of use to you:

Series playlists: Sticking stuff in a playlist is a good idea, but did you know you can make something called a series playlist? This kind of forces the next video to be shown in the sidebar (as long as people click on it and don't bounce from your content) and is a good way to keep people engaged. Regular playlists may or may not show the next video in your series, or they may show a totally separate video in the sidebar.

You focused intros: I saw a video a while back that claimed they had data that showed that videos that say "you" in the intro get around 30% more clicks than those that don't. I implemented this, and while I don't have the data, I can anecdotally say that it is a game changer. This change was correlated with my significant rise in average view duration (I've gone from 3:05 to 4:40 over the last several months, with spikes into the high 5 and low 6 minute ranges).

I start most videos with "<Greeting> In this video you will learn how to do X. You don't need to know how to do A or B or C, you just have to follow along". This let's me stick in 3 "yous" in the first 10 seconds and seems to be a winning strategy for me.

This is congruent with the overall message of your proposal writing framework, so I think it would be a great fit for your channel, or at least, something to experiment with.

Subscriber watermark: I put a little watermark in the bottom right of the video that people can use to subscribe. I have zero data on how much effect this has, but it hasn't seem to hurt things. In the new YouTube Dashboard, you go to settings -> Channel -> Branding. I just downloaded a basic "Subscribe" image from Google and used that. You can use something more closely aligned with your branding if it floats your boat.

I couple that with featuring my most subscribed video to non subscribers, and I feature a video with the highest watch time to subscribers. The logic here is that I want to do as much as I can to get people in the door, and then keep them watching my content for as long as possible.

Dropping helpful or amusing comments in the videos of other mega stars in your field is a solid way to get a few extra subs. I know that John Morris talks a lot about freelancing, but for devs. There is a universality to what you preach, so it may be worthwhile to stop by and drop some comments.

I would also recommend considering changing the channel name to something like "Freelancing with Lex DeVille" or "Building your Freelance Empire with Lex DeVille". If you couple that with the previous suggestion, you'll be able to grow significantly quicker.

I'm not a mega star, but I think each of these small tweaks have helped me achieve relatively quick success. I hit 1000 subs on March 23rd of this year (22 months since starting on YT), implemented most of these changes in the last several months, and then hit 3500 today. Not viral growth, but it makes it easier to endure the grind when you see some growth in your growth rate.

Also, upload frequency: I struggle with this since my content is primarily AI tutorials, which take significant amounts of time to prep, but I've found that 10 - 12 per month is ideal and that 1 per week is the bare minimum to cement the gains you've made.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Moderator
  • #37
OP
OP
Andy Black

Andy Black

Any colour, as long as it's red.
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
May 20, 2014
8,544
36,243
4,306
Ireland
I'm waaaay behind on this. My mum's been in and out of hospital for the past few weeks and it throws everything out. Family first, then team, then clients. This YouTube work isn't billable or bringing in revenue (yet), so it's ended up on the long finger.

I did want to update this though because my kids LOVE that I have a YouTube channel. "How many subscribers have you got now dad? Oooo... nearly 400! Well done dad."

On the school run this morning our 11 year old in the back advised me to put a link to the new channel in the description of all the videos on my current channel (when the new channel is up). He gave me some other advice too but I didn't hear him as I was concentrating on the road. Dayum... I might have to start paying him for his YouTube consulting services.
 

Ing

Contributor
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Jun 8, 2019
92
47
48
@andy , well, may I have an ot question? Ill make it:
I m afraid of having my face in the internet. I don’t know exactly, why. Maybe I don’t want it because of my job or because of fear to be recogniced. Whats your thought about my fear?

Why? Because this thread made me a bit nervous. I think, I could make my bike tuning blog better via YouTube clips.
But clips require my face, do they?
thanks
 
  • Thread starter
  • Moderator
  • #39
OP
OP
Andy Black

Andy Black

Any colour, as long as it's red.
Staff member
EPIC CONTRIBUTOR
FASTLANE INSIDER
Read Millionaire Fastlane
Speedway Pass
May 20, 2014
8,544
36,243
4,306
Ireland
@andy , well, may I have an ot question? Ill make it:
I m afraid of having my face in the internet. I don’t know exactly, why. Maybe I don’t want it because of my job or because of fear to be recogniced. Whats your thought about my fear?

Why? Because this thread made me a bit nervous. I think, I could make my bike tuning blog better via YouTube clips.
But clips require my face, do they?
thanks
Clips don’t *require* your face, but would likely benefit from it.

I can understand wanting to fly under the radar because of a job.

I can also understand a fear of the camera. It was super weird doing a selfie video and talking to the phone with no-one there. It’s incredible how self-conscious and stupid you suddenly feel. And then there’s the cringe factor when you look back on the video.

I think this is normal. We’re seeing and hearing ourselves how others do and not how we normally do. It takes getting used to. Practice it. I kinda enjoyed the weird feeling because it was so new and unexpected. It’s pretty much gone now because of practice.

Then there’s the more pragmatic part. Don’t worry about what people think of your video... because hardly anyone will see it anyway! You can publish to YouTube or wherever and most likely no-one will see it at all.

What really helped me was creating a Snapchat account and practicing creating videos there. I only gave out my username to people who asked for it. Maybe you can do the same and create a small group of likeminded people you trust who will support and help each create videos?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ing

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.


Fastlane Insiders

View the forum AD FREE.
Private, unindexed content
Detailed process/execution threads
Monthly conference calls with doers
Ideas needing execution, more!

Join Fastlane Insiders.

Top Bottom