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Thoelt53

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What about Boston? Is it similar to NY?
As far as covid nonsense?

NY is far worse from what I know. No passport BS here. Plenty of masked morons but things are pretty much normal for the most part. I don’t see it staying this way though.
 
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KAIZOS

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Anyone else feel the same?

I have never been as rich as this year, but the state of the world has never been as bad.

Property rights?
They want to tax capital gains on homes here now. Non-conviction based confiscation for 'criminals', aka you have to prove you got your wealth trough legal means, instead of the government having to prove you didn't.
Wealth = criminal until proven not.

Freedoms?
QR-code to movement, entry, and social credit system pushing propaganda is already starting.
Health = sick until proven not.

Free-markets?
More and more government intervention, regulations etc. Especially related to carbon emissions and environment.

Privacy?
Long gone, people don't even care about it because "they have nothing to hide".

Democracy?
Our government is demissionary, but got free-reign to do anything because of covid. So basically all power with zero repercussions or pushback. I don't value a system where people can vote others wealth to themselves anyway, but this takes the cake.

Safety?
More and more people going into poverty because of inflation. Crime is rising, mainly economic (thefts/burglary). Drugcartels are actually winning against the government.

It feels like becoming king of the ashes, and I'm thinking about leaving to countries who actually value those things. But even thinking about leaving everything behind makes me feel a deep kind of sadness.

How do you guys cope?
 
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Martin Z

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After catching up on this thread a little bit I have become more thankful. Yes, I have a massive disdain for what America has become, and I desire to find something better at some point, yet I am thankful I currently reside in Texas.

I live every day as if C0VlD doesn’t exist. It is a total non issue.

We have a fake conservative governor that waits for stronger leaders to take a stand for freedom and then he jumps out in front of the parade and acts like it was his idea. Even though we have “governor alligator arms,” Texas has no lockdowns, mask, or VAXClNE mandates. We did though and that wrecked this state for me.

It’s fine for now. My life is a hell of a lot better than a lot of you folks have it. I’m incredibly thankful not to be in a lot of these places.

Puerto Rico is still on my short list. Despite blue state antics, I can still have my guns and I get 4% taxes and access to the US economy. I won’t be going there while they’re still pulling their C0VlD doomer crap though.

I do believe the pandemic BS will eventually blow over.
It's crazy how divided America is now , we don't really see that in Europe(for the most part in Europe, at least in Scandinavia. It's very little controversy around here). America got culture division all over the place for now.
 

Martin Z

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As far as C0VlD nonsense?

NY is far worse from what I know. No passport BS here. Plenty of masked morons but things are pretty much normal for the most part. I don’t see it staying this way though.
Are there vaccine passport mandates in NY? That's tough. California is infected with it too(in LA). Isn't that the definition of dictatorship? Where is the free will now?
 

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Anyone else feel the same?

I have never been as rich as this year, but the state of the world has never been as bad.

Property rights?
They want to tax capital gains on homes here now. Non-conviction based confiscation for 'criminals', aka you have to prove you got your wealth trough legal means, instead of the government having to prove you didn't.
Wealth = criminal until proven not.

Freedoms?
QR-code to movement, entry, and social credit system pushing propaganda is already starting.
Health = sick until proven not.

Free-markets?
More and more government intervention, regulations etc. Especially related to carbon emissions and environment.

Privacy?
Long gone, people don't even care about it because "they have nothing to hide".

Democracy?
Our government is demissionary, but got free-reign to do anything because of C0VlD. So basically all power with zero repercussions or pushback. I don't value a system where people can vote others wealth to themselves anyway, but this takes the cake.

Safety?
More and more people going into poverty because of inflation. Crime is rising, mainly economic (thefts/burglary). Drugcartels are actually winning against the government.

It feels like becoming king of the ashes, and I'm thinking about leaving to countries who actually value those things. But even thinking about leaving everything behind makes me feel a deep kind of sadness.

How do you guys cope?

I've never had as much money as I do now, yet I have never been this down about the way things are going.

I cope by drinking a lot.

Haha.
 

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Ya'll starting to sound January 6th'ish.
 

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I've been in Mexico for six weeks now.

If you've never spent time in a developing country before (I haven't), there's definitely some things to adjust to. You can have the full first world experience here, complete with $200 steak dinner, epic condo and ultra-fast internet, but the rich-poor divide is stark, the level of security on people's houses in the nicer areas definitely tells you you're not in Europe anymore, and the rough-around-the-edges vibe is never far away. If you go to the outlying areas of the city, people live in houses that are falling apart on unpaved dirt roads.

Also, if you want to live a first world lifestyle here, it's going to cost you just as much (or probably more) than in Europe. This may be different depending on where in Mexico you go and where in the first world you come from. Our rent here is double what we were paying in Cyprus. Groceries are maybe 15% cheaper. Luxuries and electronics are way more expensive.

That said, having gotten used to all of that, I absolutely love it here. The people are ultra-friendly and welcoming, moreso than any place I've ever been. It feels like a kind, well-functioning, family-oriented, cohesive society that hasn't been torn apart by sociopathic manipulators and social engineers (because it hasn't). I'm picking up Spanish way faster than I ever imagined, without putting any real effort into it so far. The food is great. The natural environment is beautiful. There's tons to do. It's still blazing hot in late October. It's the good life.

And best of all? Barely a hint of corona-tyranny. People are obsessed with masks here, but it's not a manipulative psycho political statement like it is in Europe. Other than the masks, it's like everything is normal. No "social distancing", no show your papers, no cold civil war. Nobody gives a shit about or would dare to enquire regarding your corona status, even when I made a hospital visit here. You can buy Ivor McTin OTC at any pharmacy. It's like a huge weight has been lifted off my shoulders since we got here. No worrying about what the next psychotic trick the government will pull or other assorted lunacy. Just normal life. And soon enough I'm sure the masks will go away too.
 

MTF

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Also, if you want to live a first world lifestyle here, it's going to cost you just as much (or probably more) than in Europe. This may be different depending on where in Mexico you go and where in the first world you come from. Our rent here is double what we were paying in Cyprus. Groceries are maybe 15% cheaper. Luxuries and electronics are way more expensive.

Wow the rent thing is crazy. Do you at least have more space or a nicer house or a worse one for double the price? Is it an apartment or a house? Where are you exactly?

People are obsessed with masks here, but it's not a manipulative psycho political statement like it is in Europe.

I personally hate it. I'm in the Canary Islands now and the mask obsession is so silly I just can't believe it every day I'm here. Little kids 3-4 years old wearing masks when rollerblading, teenagers hanging out wearing masks, lone drivers driving with their masks on (I swear, they pretty much always do some stupid shit while driving), supermarket clerks chasing you down the empty aisles to tell you to pull up the mask over your nose... Compared to Poland where few people give a shit, it's almost exactly as if we're still in 2020 and the virus is going to wipe out humanity (that's despite Spain being one of the most v-ccinated countries in the world).

Is this the same in Mexico?
 

Thoelt53

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Wow the rent thing is crazy. Do you at least have more space or a nicer house or a worse one for double the price? Is it an apartment or a house? Where are you exactly?

The place we have here is both bigger and nicer, but a 3-bedroom apartment in both cases. In Cyprus we had a high quality apartment in the best part of town, and here (in Puerto Vallarta) we have an exceptionally high quality apartment in a very good part of town, but by no means the most expensive area. So we do get more, but I can't see how we would have found anything acceptable for even remotely close to what we were paying in Cyprus. We're paying around $2000/month now and this was actually a bargain compared to what's typically on the market - I've seen plenty of places advertised at $2500-3000 that aren't as nice as where we're staying now.

I personally hate it. I'm in the Canary Islands now and the mask obsession is so silly I just can't believe it every day I'm here. Little kids 3-4 years old wearing masks when rollerblading, teenagers hanging out wearing masks, lone drivers driving with their masks on (I swear, they pretty much always do some stupid shit while driving), supermarket clerks chasing you down the empty aisles to tell you to pull up the mask over your nose... Compared to Poland where few people give a shit, it's almost exactly as if we're still in 2020 and the virus is going to wipe out humanity (that's despite Spain being one of the most v-ccinated countries in the world).

Is this the same in Mexico?

It's pretty bad here with the masks but not that bad. Weirdly Cyprus had very low mask compliance by comparison but there were tons of lone car-maskers there, whereas here I hardly ever see one. Technically I think there's a law here where you have to wear a mask everywhere inside and out, but they don't enforce it outside. How many you see outside seems to vary by area. Richer area = more masks. I'd say it's around 30-40% in general around here. The worst people seem to be visitors from California. :rofl: Nice restaurants won't let you in without a mask but as soon as you get inside the door you can take it off and they won't bother you about it ever again. Magic entry-fabric to the rescue!

In supermarkets it's pretty much 100% and they have these devices to take your temperature and some places they love to give you the stupid hand gel, but they don't care if you wear it under the nose or pull it down or whatever.

Anecdotally it seems to be improving. Outside masks were more like 80% when we first got here and "Covid was spiking".

The absolute dumbest and most absurd thing is they make you wear masks at the gym here. So I just bought a Peloton instead. That's a really infuriating one, but it still doesn't bother me the same way it did in Europe as I know it's a phase instead of a "new normal", and it's not driven by malice.
 

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I've been in Mexico for six weeks now.

If you've never spent time in a developing country before (I haven't), there's definitely some things to adjust to. You can have the full first world experience here, complete with $200 steak dinner, epic condo and ultra-fast internet, but the rich-poor divide is stark, the level of security on people's houses in the nicer areas definitely tells you you're not in Europe anymore, and the rough-around-the-edges vibe is never far away. If you go to the outlying areas of the city, people live in houses that are falling apart on unpaved dirt roads.

Also, if you want to live a first world lifestyle here, it's going to cost you just as much (or probably more) than in Europe. This may be different depending on where in Mexico you go and where in the first world you come from. Our rent here is double what we were paying in Cyprus. Groceries are maybe 15% cheaper. Luxuries and electronics are way more expensive.

That said, having gotten used to all of that, I absolutely love it here. The people are ultra-friendly and welcoming, moreso than any place I've ever been. It feels like a kind, well-functioning, family-oriented, cohesive society that hasn't been torn apart by sociopathic manipulators and social engineers (because it hasn't). I'm picking up Spanish way faster than I ever imagined, without putting any real effort into it so far. The food is great. The natural environment is beautiful. There's tons to do. It's still blazing hot in late October. It's the good life.

And best of all? Barely a hint of corona-tyranny. People are obsessed with masks here, but it's not a manipulative psycho political statement like it is in Europe. Other than the masks, it's like everything is normal. No "social distancing", no show your papers, no cold civil war. Nobody gives a shit about or would dare to enquire regarding your corona status, even when I made a hospital visit here. You can buy Ivor McTin OTC at any pharmacy. It's like a huge weight has been lifted off my shoulders since we got here. No worrying about what the next psychotic trick the government will pull or other assorted lunacy. Just normal life. And soon enough I'm sure the masks will go away too.

My rent on the other coast of Mexico for a 2br/2.5ba, top floor, very nice quality high end building, 1 block from the beach, right in the center but quiet area, 2 rooftop pools, rooftop bar/grill, gym in the building, etc costs $1600/m plus electricity.

Not dirt cheap, but not expensive at all.
 

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My rent on the other coast of Mexico for a 2br/2.5ba, top floor, very nice quality high end building, 1 block from the beach, right in the center but quiet area, 2 rooftop pools, rooftop bar/grill, gym in the building, etc costs $1600/m plus electricity.

Not dirt cheap, but not expensive at all.

Wow, definitely cheaper than Vallarta.
 

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The place we have here is both bigger and nicer, but a 3-bedroom apartment in both cases. In Cyprus we had a high quality apartment in the best part of town, and here (in Puerto Vallarta) we have an exceptionally high quality apartment in a very good part of town, but by no means the most expensive area. So we do get more, but I can't see how we would have found anything acceptable for even remotely close to what we were paying in Cyprus. We're paying around $2000/month now and this was actually a bargain compared to what's typically on the market - I've seen plenty of places advertised at $2500-3000 that aren't as nice as where we're staying now.

Wow that's crazy. Here in the Canary Islands you also have to pay at least $2000 for something nicer but I'm not checking apartments but houses with gardens away from urban areas so maybe it's cheaper in cities (or actually maybe more expensive).

Either way, I've noticed a huge inflation in terms of accommodation. Finding something nice for a sensible price is a pain in the a$$. Makes me think that I finally need to find that one good place where I want to spend a good part of a year and build or buy a house there.

It's pretty bad here with the masks but not that bad. Weirdly Cyprus had very low mask compliance by comparison but there were tons of lone car-maskers there, whereas here I hardly ever see one.
In supermarkets it's pretty much 100% and they have these devices to take your temperature and some places they love to give you the stupid hand gel, but they don't care if you wear it under the nose or pull it down or whatever.
The absolute dumbest and most absurd thing is they make you wear masks at the gym here. So I just bought a Peloton instead. That's a really infuriating one, but it still doesn't bother me the same way it did in Europe as I know it's a phase instead of a "new normal", and it's not driven by malice.

That sounds to me like way worse than Cyprus or much of Europe except for the most ridiculous countries (like Spain and Portugal).

I know firsthand how some of these developing countries operate with c-vid. They can't be beaten when it comes to nonsensical rules. People often follow them with obedience because the sad reality of these countries is that proper (nonconformist) education is lacking and they can't think for themselves. They essentially delegate all their thinking to the "experts" and actually trust them (lol).

Then again, I'm now in the Canary Islands and it's shitty here as well despite some of the world's highest vaccination rates (makes you think this shit will never end). I hoped that Mexico would be better as I was considering going there next but it seems like it might be hard to find a place where it's relatively normal.
 

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It's pretty bad here with the masks but not that bad. Weirdly Cyprus had very low mask compliance by comparison but there were tons of lone car-maskers there, whereas here I hardly ever see one. Technically I think there's a law here where you have to wear a mask everywhere inside and out, but they don't enforce it outside. How many you see outside seems to vary by area. Richer area = more masks. I'd say it's around 30-40% in general around here. The worst people seem to be visitors from California. :rofl: Nice restaurants won't let you in without a mask but as soon as you get inside the door you can take it off and they won't bother you about it ever again. Magic entry-fabric to the rescue!

On the other Mexican coast in pdc I'd say you see maybe 10-15% of people walking around with masks on, not more and its mostly locals wearing the masks. They have regulations here that require them to wear masks when working in customer service related jobs like shops, bars and restaurants so most likely it just becomes a habit for those people.

Occasionally a restaurant (happens maybe once every 2 weeks and I eat out every day) will ask for a mask to enter but as you said you take it off as soon as you walk in because the magic entry fabric did its duty.

In supermarkets it's pretty much 100% and they have these devices to take your temperature and some places they love to give you the stupid hand gel, but they don't care if you wear it under the nose or pull it down or whatever.

In pdc all the supermarkets, walmart and chain stores require you to enter with the mask, but don't care once you are inside. I've heard from locals that the big stores are given govt money to enforce the rules so they do so only for the payment. Cannot confirm this, but I've heard this from multiple local sources.

The absolute dumbest and most absurd thing is they make you wear masks at the gym here. So I just bought a Peloton instead. That's a really infuriating one, but it still doesn't bother me the same way it did in Europe as I know it's a phase instead of a "new normal", and it's not driven by malice.

Gyms here are about 50/50. Some want you wearing a mask, but don't enforce too much and the biggest gym chain here has no masks at all and no one wears one there.

In general, I don't even put a mask in my pocket here. On the off chance a place requests it, they'll give me one to enter, but that is extremely rare.
 

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Gyms here are about 50/50. Some want you wearing a mask, but don't enforce too much and the biggest gym chain here has no masks at all and no one wears one there.
Are you talking about Evolve? I went out and bought home gym equipment and a streaming membership because the last time I went to one most were wearing masks.
There's a really nice Crossfit gym down the road that no one wears them at that I might start going to.

I hoped that Mexico would be better as I was considering going there next but it seems like it might be hard to find a place where it's relatively normal.
Like @GlobalWealth said, over on this coast it's mostly a non-issue. However, when I was last in Mexico City it was terrible. 95% of people walking around outside were masked. I couldn't wait to get back over here. So it really depends on where you go in the country. The further away you get from the big cities, the less scamdemic nonsense you have to deal with.
 

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Are you talking about Evolve? I went out and bought home gym equipment and a streaming membership because the last time I went to one most were wearing masks.
There's a really nice Crossfit gym down the road that no one wears them at that I might start going to.


Like @GlobalWealth said, over on this coast it's mostly a non-issue. However, when I was last in Mexico City it was terrible. 95% of people walking around outside were masked. I couldn't wait to get back over here. So it really depends on where you go in the country. The further away you get from the big cities, the less scamdemic nonsense you have to deal with.
I guess that depends where in Mexico city. I was recently just outside it in Toluca for a month and the only place anyone wore masks was big box chains and malls and stuff. I'd say it was like 50/50 if people had them on anywhere else, and I never wore one unless entering a larger store. Or yea, that whole magical entry fabric thing.
 

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Wow that's crazy. Here in the Canary Islands you also have to pay at least $2000 for something nicer but I'm not checking apartments but houses with gardens away from urban areas so maybe it's cheaper in cities (or actually maybe more expensive).

Either way, I've noticed a huge inflation in terms of accommodation. Finding something nice for a sensible price is a pain in the a$$. Makes me think that I finally need to find that one good place where I want to spend a good part of a year and build or buy a house there.

Yeah it feels like there's two separate economies here. There's the rich city and the poor city and they seldom intersect. My sense is that there's a much higher % of wealthy people here than in Europe (locals included), but also much more poor.

Haven't specifically noticed housing inflation but it makes sense, money printer go brrrrr. Also, remote work going mainstream means prices being less and less tied to the local economy.

That sounds to me like way worse than Cyprus or much of Europe except for the most ridiculous countries (like Spain and Portugal).

I know firsthand how some of these developing countries operate with c-vid. They can't be beaten when it comes to nonsensical rules. People often follow them with obedience because the sad reality of these countries is that proper (nonconformist) education is lacking and they can't think for themselves. They essentially delegate all their thinking to the "experts" and actually trust them (lol).

Then again, I'm now in the Canary Islands and it's shitty here as well despite some of the world's highest vaccination rates (makes you think this shit will never end). I hoped that Mexico would be better as I was considering going there next but it seems like it might be hard to find a place where it's relatively normal.

It's way worse than Cyprus in terms of masks, but infinitely better in every other way. Zero chance I'm going to continue living in any place which demands I pay to get a swab stuck up my nose every 3 days just so I can order a coffee or buy food. Or deal with the indignity of showing your papers to these clowns working the supermarket doors. Or frankly, be part of any society where people accept that grotesque system. Couldn't get out of there fast enough.

The last few months we were there I had this semi-perpetual jawache from being constantly on edge wondering about what the next dystopian BS would be. Miss Cyprus every day, but it's dead to me now.

On the other Mexican coast in pdc I'd say you see maybe 10-15% of people walking around with masks on, not more and its mostly locals wearing the masks. They have regulations here that require them to wear masks when working in customer service related jobs like shops, bars and restaurants so most likely it just becomes a habit for those people.

Occasionally a restaurant (happens maybe once every 2 weeks and I eat out every day) will ask for a mask to enter but as you said you take it off as soon as you walk in because the magic entry fabric did its duty.



In pdc all the supermarkets, walmart and chain stores require you to enter with the mask, but don't care once you are inside. I've heard from locals that the big stores are given govt money to enforce the rules so they do so only for the payment. Cannot confirm this, but I've heard this from multiple local sources.



Gyms here are about 50/50. Some want you wearing a mask, but don't enforce too much and the biggest gym chain here has no masks at all and no one wears one there.

In general, I don't even put a mask in my pocket here. On the off chance a place requests it, they'll give me one to enter, but that is extremely rare.

Wow. That's interesting because I've repeatedly heard on the grapevine that PDC is notorious for being the worst place in Mexico for corona-BS. I wonder if that means Vallarta is extra-bad and isn't representative of the norm.

Seems to be somewhat of a social status thing here. The biggest mask-wearers are the Americans and the wealthier locals. The nicer the place, the more masks.
 

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I guess that depends where in Mexico city. I was recently just outside it in Toluca for a month and the only place anyone wore masks was big box chains and malls and stuff. I'd say it was like 50/50 if people had them on anywhere else, and I never wore one unless entering a larger store. Or yea, that whole magical entry fabric thing.
Good point. I was only in the nicer districts for my time there. Carlos Slim's art gallery was the worst. I almost got kicked out because they asked me to put my mask up above my nose so many times...ugh. I'm headed to Guadalajara in a couple weeks for a wedding so we'll see how it is there.

Wow. That's interesting because I've repeatedly heard on the grapevine that PDC is notorious for being the worst place in Mexico for corona-BS. I wonder if that means Vallarta is extra-bad and isn't representative of the norm.
In my experience, it's the worst up in Cancun and as you go down the coast it gets better and better. The local government puts on a show on 5th Ave here when they need to for the cameras so they can look tough on covid. Tulum & Bacalar you almost feel like pre-scamdemic.
 

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I feel blessed to live in the USA BECAUSE I was lucky enough to have escaped Venezuela. I see people complaining about first world problems like taxes, rules and regulations and I think to myself, what if you lived in Venezuela ?!?, where taxes come in the form of risking your life just to go out and get food, having electricity and water every other day (you are lucky if they coincide to get laundry done), super slow internet (when available), and living in fear of (you or your loved ones) getting kidnapped, raped, or killed. In third world countries also, the odds are stacked against those who don't have money and connections.

I guess the only upside in crime riddled third world countries is that in survival mode there is no time to feel depressed or sorry for oneself.

...and now back to my 100-hour indebted servitude job, which the whining in this thread somehow managed to make me thankful for...
 
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I feel blessed to live in the USA BECAUSE I was lucky enough to have escaped Venezuela. I see people complaining about first world problems like taxes, rules and regulations and I think to myself, what if you lived in Venezuela ?!?, where taxes come in the form of risking your life just to go out and get food, having electricity and water every other day (you are lucky if they coincide to get laundry done), super slow internet (when available), and living in fear of (you or your loved ones) getting kidnapped, raped, or killed. In third world countries also, the more the odds are stacked against those who don't have money and connections.

I guess the only upside in crime riddled third world countries is that in survival mode there is no time to feel depressed or sorry for oneself.

...and now back to my 100-hour indebted servitude job, which the whining in this thread somehow managed to make me thankful for...
Were you born and raised there? If so, what was it like before the government nationalized everything and kicked all the foreign companies out?

What was the people's mentality there as total control was handed to the government? I am honestly curious!!
 

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Forget the notion of Left and Right, how Venezuela went down the drain was a different thing. Venezuela was always left leaning, with two parties, one conservative (Partiso Social Cristiano - note that the conservatives had the word "social" in their name ), and the liberal party (Accion Democratica).

Were you born and raised there? If so, what was it like before the government nationalized everything and kicked all the foreign companies out?
- I grew up in Venezuela but was born in the US, so my escape was easy. My parents emigrated from Colombia to Venezuela in the 70's when the Petroleum boom made Venezuela a very attractive country to emigrate to. Although my escape was easy, I always thought that I would live in Venezuela the rest of my life and had left with the intent of going back (which never happened).
- Today, there is foreign investment in Venezuela, it is just from China and Iran. The worst type mind it, but there is.
- The concept of foreign companies operating in Venezuela was always different, foreign companies had to establish Venezuelan subsidiaries (or joint ventures) to operate in Venezuela long before Chavez.
- Companies left Venezuela mostly on their own, what was "nationalized" was for the most part empty skeletons. Most of the "foreign investment" that left Venezuela was just Venezuelan entrepreneurs moving their money (and at the end their companies) elsewhere.

What was the people's mentality there as total control was handed to the government? I am honestly curious!!

- The mentality of Venezuelans before Chavez was that they were tired of the corrupt political class and needed a no-nonsense, no-filter, non-politician Outsider to come and "fix the corruption" and whatever was wrong with Venezuela. Chavez was that outsider. Forget about left and right. Chavez was a populist-nationalist who radicalized his base by telling them what they wanted to hear. Chavez was also Nationalist as he isolated Venezuela from the "poor" neighbor (Colombia - being of Colombian descent this felt specially hard on me and my family). Chavez also found a common enemy in the US and the "Globalists". Chavez also reverted the open-economy that the previous administration had started by imposing tarifs and isolating Venezuela economically.
- The Venezuelan constitution was a carbon copy (CC) of the US constitution, in theory Venezuela has the three branches of government (the 1961 version was the modern constitution when democracy - democratic republic - was truly established - after dictatorships). The decay happened in slow motion. Chavez started by selecting people in the executive branch that would bend the rules to his favor, if the person didn't bend the rules, he quickly replaced them. As he gained more power, he started taking over the Judicial and Legislative branches by bending the rules. Chavez did whatever he could to stay in power, because if the opposition won, he would have gone straight to prison.
- I watched in terror over the 20 years I have been in the US as the Chavistas took over, even after Chavez died. The Chavistas had already amassed so much power for themselves that even after Chavez died, they managed to keep the power. The economic problems were exacerbated when the oil (and other commodities) prices fell; when this happened, the underinvestment in infrastructure and education became evident and irreversible.
- To this day, Chavez's base still think he was the savior and that the other Chavistas (Maduro, who also is a POS) just weren't up to task. Chavez's base still keeps their cult of personality.
- Today in Venezuela there is despair , hunger, and people just wanting to get out. Venezuelans are scattered over the rest of Latin America, and all the way to Mexico and the US. They do whatever jobs they are allowed to send money back to family back in Venezuela.



Were you born and raised there? If so, what was it like before the government nationalized everything and kicked all the foreign companies out?

What was the people's mentality there as total control was handed to the government? I am honestly curious!!
 
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MTF

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I feel blessed to live in the USA BECAUSE I was lucky enough to have escaped Venezuela. I see people complaining about first world problems like taxes, rules and regulations and I think to myself, what if you lived in Venezuela ?!?, where taxes come in the form of risking your life just to go out and get food, having electricity and water every other day (you are lucky if they coincide to get laundry done), super slow internet (when available), and living in fear of (you or your loved ones) getting kidnapped, raped, or killed. In third world countries also, the more the odds are stacked against those who don't have money and connections.

I guess the only upside in crime riddled third world countries is that in survival mode there is no time to feel depressed or sorry for oneself.

...and now back to my 100-hour indebted servitude job, which the whining in this thread somehow managed to make me thankful for...

Having recently read a diary of an Auschwitz survivor, I understand the sentiment. My parents grew up in communist Poland where life was tough and freedoms were greatly limited while I can enjoy a capitalist society with more freedom. It doesn't mean I can't point out that certain freedoms are going away and that the country might be on a potential downward slope (regardless of how good it is now and how good it is compared to, say, sub-Saharan Africa).

You could say you were lucky enough to be born in Venezuela and not North Korea where you don't even have any electricity, water, Internet, and where you think you live in the best country in the world and your enlightened leader is immortal.

We can always compare down but that doesn't change the fact that people still have the right to complain. Of course, appreciation is necessary but it doesn't exclude speaking up when something is wrong.

I'm pretty sure that when Venezuela was still a normal country, people used to complain, too (some could probably see where it was going). There were probably others saying "you shouldn't complain because you don't live in Somalia."

Countries change. They may still offer a great lifestyle but if they reward laziness, idiot leaders, and make life difficult for people who think for themselves, they will eventually collapse. It really doesn't take that much to go from a stable, prosperous country to a hellhole.

If people don't voice their disapproval, their country might be next in line to become Venezuela or another failed state in one way or another. Yes, it's way worse to live in many countries than in the US but nobody said that the US can't actually become one of these terrible countries relatively soon if they keep up with their policies.

This doesn't apply to the US alone; many countries where life is good are on a similar path. Should we just smile and rejoice we're lucky to live in them, ignorant of the worrying tendencies? Can we never express our opinion that things aren't going the right way? Are we forbidden from seeking places where our future might be better because it's more aligned with our values?
 

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Thanks for the info! I heard from people being there right now, that it really depends on the area you are located. The upper right, more surfy area is worse then on the westcoast I recall. I will do the research!
Exactly, is a matter of doing thorough research, avoiding hot spots and having a plan B, C, D... in case things get worse.

Having recently read a diary of an Auschwitz survivor, I understand the sentiment. My parents grew up in communist Poland where life was tough and freedoms were greatly limited while I can enjoy a capitalist society with more freedom. It doesn't mean I can't point out that certain freedoms are going away and that the country might be on a potential downward slope (regardless of how good it is now and how good it is compared to, say, sub-Saharan Africa).

You could say you were lucky enough to be born in Venezuela and not North Korea where you don't even have any electricity, water, Internet, and where you think you live in the best country in the world and your enlightened leader is immortal.

We can always compare down but that doesn't change the fact that people still have the right to complain. Of course, appreciation is necessary but it doesn't exclude speaking up when something is wrong.

I'm pretty sure that when Venezuela was still a normal country, people used to complain, too (some could probably see where it was going). There were probably others saying "you shouldn't complain because you don't live in Somalia."

Countries change. They may still offer a great lifestyle but if they reward laziness, idiot leaders, and make life difficult for people who think for themselves, they will eventually collapse. It really doesn't take that much to go from a stable, prosperous country to a hellhole.

If people don't voice their disapproval, their country might be next in line to become Venezuela or another failed state in one way or another. Yes, it's way worse to live in many countries than in the US but nobody said that the US can't actually become one of these terrible countries relatively soon if they keep up with their policies.

This doesn't apply to the US alone; many countries where life is good are on a similar path. Should we just smile and rejoice we're lucky to live in them, ignorant of the worrying tendencies? Can we never express our opinion that things aren't going the right way? Are we forbidden from seeking places where our future might be better because it's more aligned with our values?

I don't know if you plan to stay long in Spain but one thing is for sure, it's going to "red pill" you to levels beyond your imagination. :rofl:

Reading your comments I can tell the process has already begun and there's no way back. It's going to change your perception on humanity. And the longer you stay and interact with the environment you will start catching more of the subtle idiosincracies of the people.

If you feel disgust, anger, frustration or incapacity to comprehend weird behaviors as if you were surrounded by robots or pets, then it's a confirmation. At that point I suggest you to be patient and remain calm or you could become paranoid and affect you psychologically.

Then you will read my comments again and everything will make sense, you will see their stupid need to be in conflict with everyone or to self-inflict suffering for no reason or to self-sabotage.

You will feel sad but at the same time very happy because you're not one of them.

This happened to me many years ago when I was entering adulthood, it's painful but I'm also very grateful, it made me a a truth seeker... or I should say, it revealed the truth seeker in me.

And I think you and many others here are like that, which is why I feel so lucky of finding MJ's work and the forum. :thumbsup:
 
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Zaratustra

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If we agree that "follow your passion" leads to terrible outcomes in business ventures, then it should be same when choosing a country.
You don't like cold weather? f##k you, take a cold shower and get used to it.
You don't speak language? f##k you, put some time and learn the language within months.

After all, greatest pleasure comes from overcoming obstacles, not by lying on a beach with just perfect temperature & humidity.

Let's change the word "productocracy" with "country"
Commandments would be:
Time - is this country likely to last next century? or is it under the threat of collapsing within a decade or so?
Control - Is there enough freedom for you to provide a great value for the benefit for all?
Scale - Is there large enough population for your product (unless it's a software/internet business)? Or do you need to tackle with exporting goods to other countries?
Entry - Can this country be easily influenced by foreign forces? Is the official leader an actual leader or is it a puppet state? Does it have a strong "moat" around it?
Need - Does this country generally welcomes your ethnicity/race/origins? Does it need your particular skillsets?

What would be the "septic tank cleaning" equivalent country?
 

MJ DeMarco

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What would be the "septic tank cleaning" equivalent country?

That's probably a pretty lucrative business, lol.

Let's change the word "productocracy" with "country"
Commandments would be:
Time - is this country likely to last next century? or is it under the threat of collapsing within a decade or so?
Control - Is there enough freedom for you to provide a great value for the benefit for all?
Scale - Is there large enough population for your product (unless it's a software/internet business)? Or do you need to tackle with exporting goods to other countries?
Entry - Can this country be easily influenced by foreign forces? Is the official leader an actual leader or is it a puppet state? Does it have a strong "moat" around it?
Need - Does this country generally welcomes your ethnicity/race/origins? Does it need your particular skillsets?

Under my own CENTS criteria, not sure there is any country.
 

MTF

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If we agree that "follow your passion" leads to terrible outcomes in business ventures, then it should be same when choosing a country.
You don't like cold weather? f##k you, take a cold shower and get used to it.
You don't speak language? f##k you, put some time and learn the language within months.

After all, greatest pleasure comes from overcoming obstacles, not by lying on a beach with just perfect temperature & humidity.

Life isn't about making yourself miserable for the sake of being miserable. I hate cold weather and I still hated it even when I was taking cold showers every single day and swimming or surfing in water of 3-5 degrees Celsius.

Some people thrive in cold climates, some thrive in warm climates. Some like it cloudy, others like it sunny. The job of a self-aware entrepreneur is to find where they feel and operate best. Upgrading your home base can make a dramatic impact on your overall well-being, happiness, and performance in business. Meanwhile, staying in a bad place can literally kill you.

MJ DeMarco" data-source="post: 969685" class="bbCodeBlock bbCodeBlock--expandable bbCodeBlock--quote js-expandWatch">
Under my own CENTS criteria, not sure there is any country.

Not sure what your CENTS criteria are but based on my experience, there are at least a few places that do match all of @Zaratustra's requirements:
  • Liechtenstein - one of my favorite countries in Europe. Extremely beautiful, super small with a super small population but functions pretty much like a part of Switzerland so it gives you access to a much larger population AND also that of neighboring countries (including a huge German-speaking market). It's a principality with the Prince having veto powers so theoretically not that free but one doesn't have to look long to see how great "fully democratic" countries fare. Not much ever changes there but it doesn't pretend to be a futuristic place. It just works well and there's no need to reinvent the wheel. Hard to immigrate to, though, as they have immigration limits.
  • Switzerland - one of my favorite countries in Europe, too. Super stable, with a lot of freedom, great business opportunities, incredible landscapes, solid infrastructure, and in general working well. It's also fun that it's a multi-cultural and multi-language country. Like Liechtenstein, perhaps it isn't changing super fast but it doesn't have to, either.
  • Andorra - not my favorite but I can't deny that it's also very free and its location gives you easy access to both France and Spain. They have very low taxes and are very entrepreneur-friendly. Some nice landscapes, too but it has a claustrophobic feel as it's mostly located in a narrow valley.
  • Monaco - I didn't like it as it was waaaay too small and claustrophobic but you get much better climate and a lot of luxury if that's your thing. Also very tax-friendly and with easy access to France and Italy.
  • Singapore - didn't like it that much as it's too urbanized (though incomparably better than Monaco) but again, I can't deny it's probably one of the most entrepreneur-friendly and capitalistic countries in the world. Huge sums of money floating there. Like Switzerland they're also a neutral country so super stable, too.
Like I said a few times before, if the cold weather and lack of ocean didn't bother me that much, I'd probably move to Liechtenstein or Switzerland. But who knows, maybe one day I'll buy a house in Switzerland to spend there some time each year.
 

MTF

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So they called their covid pass the "Opportunity Pass". How cynical... At the time of the USSR, the official communist party's newspaper was the Pravda. I only learned recently that Pravda means... "Truth". In Orwell's 1984, the Ministry of Love is in charge of torturing those who wouldn't comply... Now it's real.
 

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