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jon.a

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Argue

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I have an autographed one. :)
My company specializes in selling antiques. For $997, we can find you clients and sell your stuff. If interested, contact us today. But hurry, our offer ends in 30 minutes. :D
 

Arnika

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I have always wanted to crack the code of these Shopify drop-shippers. Shopify is an excellent service and they have received some heat previously because of the "millionaire" drop-shippers. Their stock even took a plunge during that time, but it seemed to have recovered now. Some of you might hate Shopify because of these so called gurus, but you can integrate it to any online store easy.

Flashing of luxury will definitely sell, just like sex sells. Without disrespecting any women, look at these so called "Instagram models". All they do is show some skin, show their butt off on pictures, and they have a massive following. With the massive following they literally get sponsor money thrown at them.

As someone mentioned previously, what could those $2,997 courses offer? If anyone on here has been drawn into one of those courses(I am really sorry that has happened to you), would you mind sharing what those courses have to offer?
 

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Blackadder

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Are you saying Hubbard was a type of "get rich guru"? The short clip seems to show him in the same vein.

You don't get rich writing science fiction. If you want to get rich, you start a religion.
~L.Ron Hubbard~

  • Response to a question from the audience during a meeting of the Eastern Science Fiction Association on (7 November 1948), as quoted in a 1994 affidavit by Sam Moskowitz.
 

p0stscript

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You don't get rich writing science fiction. If you want to get rich, you start a religion.
~L.Ron Hubbard
Thank you for the response @Blackadder , unfortunately the video clip on its own that @AndrewNC posted didn't explain things to me, even a quick internet search didn't help in the context of this thread, other than discovering Hubbard was convicted for fraud.
 

ZF Lee

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Are you saying Hubbard was a type of "get rich guru"? The short clip seems to show him in the same vein.
He's not a really get rich guru. It is more similar to an MLM.

I'm not sure if this toes along the forum rule redlines.
Scientology is a religion officially, but has business mechanisms.

Scientology has lots of courses and books for its members to improve their thinking as far as their organization is concerned.

How Scientology costs members up to millions of dollars, according to Leah Remini’s show

'Remini showed off a large bookcase in her home filled with L. Ron Hubbard (the founder) texts. One wouldn’t think that books for church membership could cost thousands of dollars, but Remini explained that there are 12 basic books in Scientology, and the package costs about $4,000. And a member will often have to buy the books multiple times whenever Scientology says they’ve been updated.

Additionally, Scientology allegedly tells members that libraries have a demand for the books and encourages members to buy multiple book packages to donate to libraries.

In addition to books, Remini said that Scientologists must buy Hubbard’s lectures, various audio CDs, donate to the church’s causes, and pay a membership fee.'


And to think of it, the entire structure is tax-free, since it is a religious body.

I could go on, with Scientology having a 'ready' labour force via the Sea Org, with its pretty effective recruiting processes and cases of societal pressure, but that MIGHT violate Fastlane rules.:clench:

There are many Fastlaners who are Scientologists. Tom Cruise and Grant Cardone are a few to note.
 
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p0stscript

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Thank you @ZF Lee , as mentioned before, I wasn't sure how the video fitted within the context of this thread, your link, and explanation, certainly indicate Scientology play a similar game.
 

Action Mike

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Every time I read about the scam gurus I feel even more strongly that the best thing you can do is spend time learning and educating yourself and taking action to allow yourself to have a built in crap filter and recognize the garbage from real advice.

One example, as much as I love the Bigger Pockets forum for real estate, there really is a lot of good advice and info on the site and podcasts, but there are also a lot of people, most likely unintentionally, giving bad advice. I've learned enough I can do a pretty good job of knowing what to take with a grain of salt vs. what makes sense and might work.

It doesn't mean you have to know everything just enough to be able to make sense out of what you hear or read, or enough to know how to really investigate it to determine its validity.

In other words your biggest protection from the people marking rather than sharing useful info is your mind :)
 

DustinH

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Instead of leasing the Lambo you could rent it. I got a buddy here in town who rents out exotic cars for the weekend or a single day. Costs anywhere between $500-$2,000 depending on the car I think. So, you could really cut the costs of your fake fantasy life and rent out a Lambo or a Ferrari for probably about $1,000 every other month and shoot your videos with them.



NOTE: This thread is NOT referencing anyone here at the forum, but the idea of it evolved from the plethora of internet gurus who now use this strategy as their "PROOF" of success.

$28,500 a year.


Not a big income right?

In Arizona, that's someone who makes $13.70 an hour working 40 hours a week all year. In Arizona, minimum wage is $10.

$28,500 is certainly not big enough of an income to consider yourself "rich" -- and certainly not big enough to PROVE that you're capable or qualified to give advice about wealth, money, or finance.

If you earned $28,500 a year in the United States, you would be considered lower-middle class, near poverty, depending on your family situation.

But what if you made $35,000 a year and lived at home with your parents, had no utility bills, no student loans, and you still hung out on your parents health insurance plan?

Well $28,500/year is all you would need to lease a Lamborghini Huracan and advertise yourself as the internet's next 25 year old "I'm rich" guru.

Yup, that's how much it costs to lease a Lamborghini, roughly $2,400 a month.

View attachment 18721

View attachment 18720

Is $2,400/mo the threshold to symbolize the ultimate in freedom and wealth?

Not exactly.

It's a start.

But it's not going to move any meter, unless your meter is an exotic car used as a prop to fool people into presuming you're making $240,000/mo.

I bring this up because it now seems the litmus test for guru legitimacy is to be standing in front of an exotic car, a Ferrari, Lambo, whatever. Heck, even I did this nearly 10 years ago (although I paid cash for my Lambo).

My point is: If your guru is standing in front of an exotic car, IS PROVES NOTHING. It doesn't prove he/she's rich. It doesn't prove he's "printing money". Heck, it doesn't even prove he/she leased it. Not a day passed in public when I had strangers taking photos in front of my Lambos, as if they owned it.

So please, next time you're evaluating a guru -- please don't look at his exotic car and presume it's a symbol of "oh wow, he's rich."

If anything, it might prove that he makes less than he's projecting.

Something to think about...

While I haven't owned an exotic in a few years, if I ever own one again I'm not sure I'm going to be taking pictures of me standing in front of it. Maybe 10 years ago, but in this day-and-age of using exotics as props, I think it might have the opposite effect. Or am I just too jaded because I'm aware of it?
 
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keith4444

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Instead of leasing the Lambo you could rent it. I got a buddy here in town who rents out exotic cars for the weekend or a single day. Costs anywhere between $500-$2,000 depending on the car I think. So, you could really cut the costs of your fake fantasy life and rent out a Lambo or a Ferrari for probably about $1,000 every other month and shoot your videos with them.
I wonder if this would be a good business model? You can rent a Ferrari/Lambo/whatever for a weekend and set up a business where you drive to your nearest guru and let him use the car for photos (he doesn’t drive it). If you can set up a few meetings in a weekend you could pay for the Supercar and probably make some money on top? Plus you get to drive the car when it’s not being used for the fake gurus ;)
If you rent supercars regularly then I’m sure you can come to a deal with the car rental place to drive overheads down.
 

Stu Schaefer

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Here's a guy selling you a $1,000 copywriting and marketing course (I think - i couldn't tell based on the copy)

... you'd think he'd know to proofread the FIRST sentence of the FIRST headline... right?

Or did he purposely make a mistake because that's a ninja copywriting trick?

copywriting guru bad copy.jpg
 

keith4444

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Here's a guy selling you a $1,000 copywriting and marketing course (I think - i couldn't tell based on the copy)

... you'd think he'd know to proofread the FIRST sentence of the FIRST headline... right?

Or did he purposely make a mistake because that's a ninja copywriting trick?

View attachment 18866
I would say its not deliberate as theres also another error at the end of the second paragraph "a case peace and a case for war"
Epic Fail IMO
 
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DavidTT

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NOTE: This thread is NOT referencing anyone here at the forum, but the idea of it evolved from the plethora of internet gurus who now use this strategy as their "PROOF" of success.

$28,500 a year.


Not a big income right?

In Arizona, that's someone who makes $13.70 an hour working 40 hours a week all year. In Arizona, minimum wage is $10.

$28,500 is certainly not big enough of an income to consider yourself "rich" -- and certainly not big enough to PROVE that you're capable or qualified to give advice about wealth, money, or finance.

If you earned $28,500 a year in the United States, you would be considered lower-middle class, near poverty, depending on your family situation.

But what if you made $35,000 a year and lived at home with your parents, had no utility bills, no student loans, and you still hung out on your parents health insurance plan?

Well $28,500/year is all you would need to lease a Lamborghini Huracan and advertise yourself as the internet's next 25 year old "I'm rich" guru.

Yup, that's how much it costs to lease a Lamborghini, roughly $2,400 a month.

View attachment 18721

View attachment 18720

Is $2,400/mo the threshold to symbolize the ultimate in freedom and wealth?

Not exactly.

It's a start.

But it's not going to move any meter, unless your meter is an exotic car used as a prop to fool people into presuming you're making $240,000/mo.

I bring this up because it now seems the litmus test for guru legitimacy is to be standing in front of an exotic car, a Ferrari, Lambo, whatever. Heck, even I did this nearly 10 years ago (although I paid cash for my Lambo).

My point is: If your guru is standing in front of an exotic car, IS PROVES NOTHING. It doesn't prove he/she's rich. It doesn't prove he's "printing money". Heck, it doesn't even prove he/she leased it. Not a day passed in public when I had strangers taking photos in front of my Lambos, as if they owned it.

So please, next time you're evaluating a guru -- please don't look at his exotic car and presume it's a symbol of "oh wow, he's rich."

If anything, it might prove that he makes less than he's projecting.

Something to think about...

While I haven't owned an exotic in a few years, if I ever own one again I'm not sure I'm going to be taking pictures of me standing in front of it. Maybe 10 years ago, but in this day-and-age of using exotics as props, I think it might have the opposite effect. Or am I just too jaded because I'm aware of it?
I actually find it interesting that you say that.

Back when I used to be a valet driver at an upscale mall, we had lambos coming in daily and I had my supervisor, who had driven tons of them (even drove a Veyron 5 times lol) tell me that Gallardos were the choosen car for the "faux riche". A lot of owners would buy it, barely being able to afford it and not being able to afford maintenance on them so there was always tons of light on the dash, bald tires, etc. Overall, a lot of them in very poor condition due to the owner not being able to afford the maintenance cost.

On the flip side, we had a billionaire come to the store on a regular just driving a black range rover or maserati, trying to stay off the radar. He also dressed pretty normal, jeans or dickies etc.

We also had a hockey player averaging ~$6.5 million/yr dress like a construction worker and just driving a basic e-class.
 

MJ DeMarco

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tell me that Gallardos were the choosen car for the "faux riche". A lot of owners would buy it, barely being able to afford it and not being able to afford maintenance on them so there was always tons of light on the dash, bald tires, etc.

Then that $28.5K drops down to about $11K a year, a used G is < $80K.
 

ay47

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The problem is: this shit works like magic. I've been to many seminars in my country where everyone is selling the dream (for research purposes, I want to learn how to market that well). My main take-away is: slowlaners want simple solutions to difficult problems. They want to make money but they don't want to do any thinking. Gurus give them the answer. Follow my step-by-step magic formula / system and you will make money. These gurus are making money like gangbusters. Each of these seminars had like 300 pp. And I estimate about 2/3 bought the $9997 systems the gurus are selling.

I dream of converting that well. :D
 
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Dave Daily

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You hit the nail on the head here.

In my value hierarchy, awakening is #1. Money is secondary. Most gurus have money #1 and their primary goal is extracting as much of it as they can from you.



Tom Vu, my favorite!


That Tom Vu clip is hilarious. I love the bevy of blonde babes playing games in the foreground.

I do find myself shifting between wanting to bring value to my customers and wanting to bring value to my bank account. I suppose practice is the key. Just get up everyday and work on creating the habit of focusing on the value proposition and how to deliver it better, rather than thinking about sales. You gotta get those sales to, so I guess it's a balancing act.

giphy.gif
 
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Owlman

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This things has always been and will always be, they are 21century charlatan. I used to follow tai Lopez, even got into his 67step program. until I read 48laws of of power.
Law 27: Play on People’s Need to Believe to Create a Cult like Following. 5 ways to create a cult.
 
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sparechange

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Like one of my brokerage accounts here?

View attachment 18729



I probably wouldn't have written the book in today's market. Too many fakers, too much noise, too much saturation.


boom

I was at my bank looking to see what my paycheck was worth (direct debit) and saw a receipt for a few grand shy of $1m. My heart sank a bit, total freedom

18 mega is FU money, cant even fathom the amount.
 
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Kak

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I truly believe one of the keys to true wealth is being willing to wait on this stuff. The cars, the boats, the watches, the McMansions. All of it. Be comfortable, but just build the foundation now. One day let your older, richer and wiser self decide if a Lamborghini is for you. Fortunately for your continued wealth you'll probably choose a silky smooth Lexus and keep building.

Money is magnetic, it opens doors that bring you more of it. Buying this shit early, when it's still a stretch, kills the golden goose. You don't need a flashy car to be taken seriously.

My favorite car is an S650 Maybach and the above is the reason there isn't one in my driveway. One day it will be a nothing to own one, right now it isn't. Will older, wiser, and richer Kak ever bring $200k to a dealership to actually buy one? I have no clue.
 
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masterneme

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The problem is: this sh*t works like magic. I've been to many seminars in my country where everyone is selling the dream (for research purposes, I want to learn how to market that well). My main take-away is: slowlaners want simple solutions to difficult problems. They want to make money but they don't want to do any thinking. Gurus give them the answer. Follow my step-by-step magic formula / system and you will make money. These gurus are making money like gangbusters. Each of these seminars had like 300 pp. And I estimate about 2/3 bought the $9997 systems the gurus are selling.

I dream of converting that well. :D
Gurus sell the dream and become millionaires,
entrepeneurs become millionaires and then sell the experience.
 

MJ DeMarco

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Bump.
 

DavidTT

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now exotic car rentals are becoming more and more of a thing. I see it all the time and tons of young guys renting them out just to stunt in downtown.

I find it interesting that the more I understand the world and the way it functions, the more I realize that a big part of it is backward. Wealth is not measured by how much one makes but how much one spends hence why we live in a consumer driven society.

If I learned anything in university, there was one thing that really struck me in my macroeconomics class; when we measure the economy, we base it on Expenditure-based GDP. In other words, we do not measure how much a country produces but how much it consumes (expenditure). That why a rise in the interest rate (monetary policies) is made when there is an economic boom (growing too fast) so there is less money being lent and it forces people to consume less in order to close the output gap whereas, when there is a recession (below potential GDP) the interest rate lowers so they could lend money for people to consume more and close to output gap and bring it back to potential GDP.

In other words;

2 guys make the same annual income ($50K yearly)
person A does not spend a dime and only saves whereas person B over-leverage himself (million dollar house, cars, debt and more debt) according to expenditure-based GDP, person B should be wealthier because he has far more expenditure.

I might be a bit wrong in my understanding so correct me if I'm wrong. This is how I understood it.
 

NCNY

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Like one of my brokerage accounts here?

View attachment 18729



I probably wouldn't have written the book in today's market. Too many fakers, too much noise, too much saturation.

That 0.04% increase in your account is almost the median monthly income of a US household

most of the people just choose to live "safe" mediocre linear income lifestyle
and by "safe" I mean they are at their employer's mercy, one medical emergency or a recession from being homeless
 
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