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Deciding between Electronic Engineering vs Computer Science

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Strider

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Apr 10, 2016
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Hey guys, I'm 19 and after a year of studying Applied Mathematics I decided to change to something more concrete and less theoretical (easier), I love math and physics but just letters, numbers and abstract things while fun make me feel like I'm missing out, I'd love to study it and focus on it if I hadn't the feeling that I need to do more and since I'm not a genius, it's no the best field.

My situation is the following, I'm from Europe college tuition is therefore quite cheap and I won't have problems with it. My college is top one in my country (and somewhere in the top 15 of Europe from what I've heard), quite old and uber theoretical, it has good partnerships and very good name in my country, but outside of it it's a bit unknown (at least compared to the difficulty and level of teachers) except for research.

I'm in doubt between Electronic and Computer Engineering and Computer Engineering (in terms of software). These courses will likely be both very theoretical comparing to most colleges. EE will be the hardest by far from what I've heard. CS one is quite good in terms of pay even without a masters, I can get just a bachelor and get a good pay, while in EE I need to get a masters to get somewhere (even though I think I want the masters).

The thing with CS is that despite being theoretical and being the best course I can get in the area it feels too strict and narrow, not sure if I'm under appreciating the field.

EE seems way more vast, I can go with energy, robotics, etc... and can focus my masters in CS if I feel like it.

I'm interested in space exploration and if I got a chance in that field I'd kill for it, but in general I want to solve problems, help people and be successful in order to keep attacking problems I see as important, environmental issues, automation and many other fields interest me as well.

Money and salary is important, because I'll most likely get a job after college and work on my projects on the side at first (if I have them), so I can't ignore that. But I mostly have to consider the skills I'll get from the courses and there I feel like CS is lacking.

I'm not sure if I'm seeing the world wrongly, but having the focus on hardware seems smart since it gives me a broader area to create solutions for right?

Thing is, sometimes when self teaching app dev (through tutorials and guides) doesn't work, I don't find the answer in google and endup with problems that I'm unable to fix, but then again, from what I've heard, most of college education is googling and stackexchange for projects, so maybe it's normal? I just need to get in an environment where I have more people to ask?

I also am very interested in AR / VR but I won't really get that from a bachelors.

I'm about to go to sleep, hope this post makes sense.

Thanks for your help!
 
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Mr.Chaos

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Hey guys, I'm 19 and after a year of studying Applied Mathematics I decided to change to something more concrete and less theoretical (easier), I love math and physics but just letters, numbers and abstract things while fun make me feel like I'm missing out, I'd love to study it and focus on it if I hadn't the feeling that I need to do more and since I'm not a genius, it's no the best field.

My situation is the following, I'm from Europe college tuition is therefore quite cheap and I won't have problems with it. My college is top one in my country (and somewhere in the top 15 of Europe from what I've heard), quite old and uber theoretical, it has good partnerships and very good name in my country, but outside of it it's a bit unknown (at least compared to the difficulty and level of teachers) except for research.

I'm in doubt between Electronic and Computer Engineering and Computer Engineering (in terms of software). These courses will likely be both very theoretical comparing to most colleges. EE will be the hardest by far from what I've heard. CS one is quite good in terms of pay even without a masters, I can get just a bachelor and get a good pay, while in EE I need to get a masters to get somewhere (even though I think I want the masters).

The thing with CS is that despite being theoretical and being the best course I can get in the area it feels too strict and narrow, not sure if I'm under appreciating the field.

EE seems way more vast, I can go with energy, robotics, etc... and can focus my masters in CS if I feel like it.

I'm interested in space exploration and if I got a chance in that field I'd kill for it, but in general I want to solve problems, help people and be successful in order to keep attacking problems I see as important, environmental issues, automation and many other fields interest me as well.

Money and salary is important, because I'll most likely get a job after college and work on my projects on the side at first (if I have them), so I can't ignore that. But I mostly have to consider the skills I'll get from the courses and there I feel like CS is lacking.

I'm not sure if I'm seeing the world wrongly, but having the focus on hardware seems smart since it gives me a broader area to create solutions for right?

Thing is, sometimes when self teaching app dev (through tutorials and guides) doesn't work, I don't find the answer in google and endup with problems that I'm unable to fix, but then again, from what I've heard, most of college education is googling and stackexchange for projects, so maybe it's normal? I just need to get in an environment where I have more people to ask?

I'm about to go to sleep, hope this post makes sense.

Thanks for your help!

I am an EE, So my opinion may be a bit biased.

I'd do EE if you're between the two. We did quite a bit of programming in my schooling as well.

You'll learn a lot and deal with some hard classes. The most valuable aspect of EE or any engineering/science program is PROBLEM-SOLVING.
 

Strider

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Apr 10, 2016
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South Europe
I am an EE, So my opinion may be a bit biased.

I'd do EE if you're between the two. We did quite a bit of programming in my schooling as well.

You'll learn a lot and deal with some hard classes. The most valuable aspect of EE or any engineering/science program is PROBLEM-SOLVING.

Yeah, I'm just afraid I might be missing out anything with CS. But overall EE seems the more complete.
My fears about CS are what made me go to Mathematics, quick buck, they get out with better pay and can get out quicker. But not sure, feels like shallow waters to me.
 

Olimac21

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Where in europe are you from and do you want to stay in your country in the long term? I would go for EE because is good for general thinking and can be applied to other areas, the thinking and level of difficulty will give you good critical-analytical skills.

Also I recommend you talk with professionals from both areas or even people who are currently studying that in the Uni you are targeting.
 

Ninjakid

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Pretty much everything you learn in CS can be found online.

I would say go with EE for the hands-on learning.
 

Owner2Millions

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Both are good choices. Me myself I chose the software side. You honestly could teach yourself both. The only difference is with EE you need to run your own mini lab with equipment but it can be found online for very cheap. So either will work. And you can still learn the other if you want. I read up on EE stuff all the time.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Sequential

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With a degree in CS you can do practically anything. You also do a lot of electronics in CS, (I did CS) we were doing circuits in the 2nd month of the first year. I dropped out in the second year as the timing was perfect (5 page websites + <3000 words total of unique content + Google Adsense = 5 figures per month aged 19) to concentrate on a Fastlane income stream than a degree. I do look back now and wish I had continued it though, not only for the knowledge that you can get for near free via books and practice but for the contacts you create especially if you do the third year industry experience.

I know people like to say stuff like "College is a waste" but the Universe takes care of you if you believe in it, everything is for a reason, look at Mark Zuckerberg, if he had never gone to Harvard in the first place, he wouldn't have thought of the idea that inspired him to create FB and become the billionaire he is now...

Sorry if my grammar etc are out, it's nearly 3am and I have my usual migraine at this time of night :/
 

Strider

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Apr 10, 2016
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South Europe
Yeah I get you guys, thanks for the help.

Truth is I'm afraid I'm looking at reality in the way I wish it was.
CS is mostly software here no real hardware, EE is the opposite but a bit more software than CS has hardware. Thing is, in terms of job and pay, CS is just a bachelor and I'm set, EE requires a Master (you can go with a bachelor but it's unadvised). I wouldn't mind coding but it isn't my dream, I'd do it for an interesting startup but my thing is something in space exploration related field, environment, biomedical, stuff like that. I'd kill to work for ESA per example (or even better a space related startup), but thing is, am I looking too innocently at the world?

I think I can increase my CS knowledge on my own (all my webdev and webdesign was with google and youtube), but not sure if I'll be missing out.
I'm going to go for internships / jobs / volunteering in the summer, these years will be focused on growth in what I feel I'm lacking. But still... not sure if I should go for the pragmatic less ideal thing.
 

Digamma

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CS is mostly useless bullshit you will never actually need to know. Go with EE. If you must go to college, that is.
 

MiguelHammond10

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Both are good I would advice you to go study EE than CS because CS you can lean most stuff you need online.
 

Sequential

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The other thing you could do depends on how much cash you have currently. Because age 21 is not too old for college (and I assume you want the social side) which gives you three years to get into a fast lane. Look around you, find something people want or need, and fulfill it.

Then in three years or so when you have a networth of 6 figures, decide if you want to go to College then, if you do, it will cost you a lot less.

The way I was told by a billionaire how they think about money is this.


The average pre-tax wage in the US is $50k.
There is no average pre tax wage for millionaires because of dividends but somewhere like $500k per year is a good starter estimate for someone with high 6 figures.

That means that every product or service costs a millionaire 1/10th or 10% of the cost it costs everyone else.

So that $100k cumalative College degree (which would likely also be debt if you went to College now) would be $10k to a millionaire.

Would you invest $10k in your future, over a 4 year period, to give you a brilliant degree? Of course you would.

This is the difference between mindset between rich and poor.

This is why poor people say stuff like "How can he just buy a new Aventador after he crashed it, and not care?" because to a Billionaire, a $500k Aventador is worth $25. And their time is worth more than $25.
 

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