The Entrepreneur Forum | Financial Freedom | Starting a Business | Motivation | Money | Success

Can one be too innovative? I'm ready to give up.

The Entrepreneur's Forum for learning how to build wealth and financial freedom the Fastlane way!

Say "NO" to mediocre living rife with jobs, ascetic frugality, and suffocating savings rituals— learn how to build a Fastlane business that pays both freedom and lifestyle affluence. Join our forum with more than 70,000 entrepreneurs who are making it happen.
Join for FREE Today
Get the books
Remove ads? Join Fastlane INSIDERS
(Registration removes this block)

caromorgan

Contributor
Read Fastlane!
May 24, 2011
28
22
61
South Africa
I know, I know, we all talk about innovation as some kind of super-power or key-to-riches.

But... here's my problem... for 10 years of more, I've been developing online software for the conference/exhibition industry. It's really, really good stuff.

But the industry is stuck in the '70s.
They don't understand what the internet can do for them, or the value of real-time bookings.
Their internal systems were designed before the internet, and as a result are clunky, time-consuming, inaccurate and often back-to-front. They employ a lot of staff to run these crappy systems - staff who don't want to lose their jobs to a better way.

I can't change the industry.
And I can't even get most people to look at my solutions, because they are in a constant state of over-worked panic due to the lack of ...well.. exactly what I am offering them.

The resistance to change is huge. And I find myself constantly developing more and more amazing features that I can't sell.

I'm ready to throw in the towel, to be honest.

Any advice?

Caro
 
Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum: Subscribe to Fastlane Insiders.

Davejemmolly

Bronze Contributor
Read Fastlane!
Read Unscripted!
Speedway Pass
Oct 1, 2018
113
250
Australia
Try to pitch it at newly establishing conference spaces, before they get sucked into the old system.

Rethink your business model?
Maybe instead of an expensive custom initial pricing strategy, selling a more affordable subscription model?

No idea if this is relevant, as I know nothing about the exhibition industry.

But if you have a clearly better solution, keep the faith!

And google the story ‘three feet from gold’ - I think it was in ‘think and grow rich’
 

caromorgan

Contributor
Read Fastlane!
May 24, 2011
28
22
61
South Africa
Try to pitch it at newly establishing conference spaces, before they get sucked into the old system.

That's a good idea.
Finding them may be tricky, but I know some people who know people... :)

And google the story ‘three feet from gold’ - I think it was in ‘think and grow rich’

Will do. I fear I've been there for about 7 of the last 10 years, though, and I'm getting demotivated.

Thanks for your reply, much appreciated :)

Caro
 

Dramolion

New Contributor
Apr 13, 2018
26
12
for 10 years of more, I've been developing online software for the conference/exhibition industry.

Who is your target-customer ?

Most people who go to conferences enjoy going to conferences, if they wouldn't they would 've switched to Skype or another service decades ago.
Instead of trying to take away on the process try to add value to it instead.
 
Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum: Subscribe to Fastlane Insiders.

caromorgan

Contributor
Read Fastlane!
May 24, 2011
28
22
61
South Africa
Who is your target-customer ?

Most people who go to conferences enjoy going to conferences, if they wouldn't they would 've switched to Skype or another service decades ago.
Instead of trying to take away on the process try to add value to it instead.

Hi there
I wasn't clear, sorry.
The target market is event organisers... in this case it's a real-time booking system for exhibitions.
 

Ninjakid

Platinum Contributor
Speedway Pass
Jun 23, 2014
1,936
4,170
Buddy Guy Eh
Spend less time developing, and learn how to sell.

Elon Musk went through the same hurdles while developing Zip2. Almost no one understood what it was let alone wanted to be part of it. They just kept knocking on doors until people wanted to try it.

Don't spend time developing new features, get people to buy what you have, and THEN improve it.

Why don't you give a handful of them away for free at first? Have you beta tested your software?
 

caromorgan

Contributor
Read Fastlane!
May 24, 2011
28
22
61
South Africa
Spend less time developing, and learn how to sell.
Very good advice. I try, but I am certainly not a natural (INTJ).

Don't spend time developing new features, get people to buy what you have, and THEN improve it.

Yep, that's the conclusion I am coming to. I've sunk too much money into developing something whizz-bang, and it's too much for the potential client to get their head around. I need to sell a basic version, and tell them about the extra features further down the line.

Why don't you give a handful of them away for free at first? Have you beta tested your software?
It has been used by one or two clients. It works just fine.
But even that can be a hurdle... the first client refused to endorse or refer us, because they didn't want their competitors to know about the software. Hahaha, aaargh :)
 
Don't like ads? Remove them while supporting the forum: Subscribe to Fastlane Insiders.

Post New Topic

Please SEARCH before posting.
Please select the BEST category.

Post new topic

New Topics

Fastlane Insiders

View the forum AD FREE.
Private, unindexed content
Detailed process/execution threads
Ideas needing execution, more!

Join Fastlane Insiders.

Must Read Books...

Explore books recommended by MJ DeMarco and other members of the Fastlane entrepreneurial community.
Fastlane Bookstore
Top