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Branding so good that it's stupid?

MakeMoreMoves

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About the title of this thread: Stupid in the sense it becomes at the very far end of emotion, zero logic applies. I know that all or most buying is emotional though.

So I am very curious to how these brands do it.

Supreme, Balenciaga, Anti Social Social Club, maybe Anthropologie

It becomes less and less about the product.

It has pretty much hit the point that is doesn't even matter what these guys sell.

I mean I briefly looked at ASSC, and this guy seems to go against all fastlane logic about the customer. This guy for ASSC does terrible customer service .

It seems like this is the marketing plan to do this:

1) Build product, most of the time it is clothing

2) Hire bunch of papparazzi

3) Do anything it takes to get a huge celebrity to wear it in public

4) Massive Social Proof

Value provided is the huge personal satisfaction of getting to wear something a celebrity wears/approves of.

Sales like no other.
 

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GravyBoat

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About the title of this thread: Stupid in the sense it becomes at the very far end of emotion, zero logic applies. I know that all or most buying is emotional though.

So I am very curious to how these brands do it.

Supreme, Balenciaga, Anti Social Social Club, maybe Anthropologie

It becomes less and less about the product.

It has pretty much hit the point that is doesn't even matter what these guys sell.

I mean I briefly looked at ASSC, and this guy seems to go against all fastlane logic about the customer. This guy for ASSC does terrible customer service .

It seems like this is the marketing plan to do this:

1) Build product, most of the time it is clothing

2) Hire bunch of papparazzi

3) Do anything it takes to get a huge celebrity to wear it in public

4) Massive Social Proof

Value provided is the huge personal satisfaction of getting to wear something a celebrity wears/approves of.

Sales like no other.
Following
 

Thoelt53

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Value provided is the huge personal satisfaction of getting to wear something a celebrity wears/approves of.
There is your value skew.

What you find value in, others may not and vice versa.

I know nothing of the ASSC, but if you could match their value skew, AND offer kickass customer service (which you say they're lacking), you could beat them at their own game, eventually.
 

MiLeung

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I cringe whenever I see someone wearing an ASSC hoodie. Like what is the message they are trying to say?

When you look at a lot of short documentaries on streetwear brands, they'll talk about their story/origin, but I think most of the people that buy their stuff know nothing about it; they're just trying to fit in with the cool kids.
 
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MakeMoreMoves

MakeMoreMoves

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I cringe whenever I see someone wearing an ASSC hoodie. Like what is the message they are trying to say?

When you look at a lot of short documentaries on streetwear brands, they'll talk about their story/origin, but I think most of the people that buy their stuff know nothing about it; they're just trying to fit in with the cool kids.
Same here. Intrinsically, they are basic cut shirts. I believe Gildan quality. Anyone with Illustrator skills could have designed everything in less than 5 minutes.

Yeah, I don't think anybody looks at the story or origin, but from all the marketing and branding knowledge I have read they say it is all about the Story. A brand is nothing without the story.

I feel like it is just the "luck" of a high status individual to wear it. I mean anything these celebrities touch turns to pure gold.

The question now is how to actually guarantee a celebrity to wear it giving it ultimate social proof validation.

The quote then comes to mind "It is not what you know, but who you know". I actually hate this quote because it is like a sad excuse not to work and being dependent on the success of others. Parasite type mentality.

EDIT: Just checked ASSC doesn't even have an about page...everything I know about marketing just got thrown out the door besides social proof from influencer/celebrity
 
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MakeMoreMoves

MakeMoreMoves

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There is your value skew.

What you find value in, others may not and vice versa.

I know nothing of the ASSC, but if you could match their value skew, AND offer kickass customer service (which you say they're lacking), you could beat them at their own game, eventually.
All value they provide is outside of their control it seems. Based on my research, it was just celebrities wearing it. Celebrities could have chosen any of the million of ecom fashion POD companies. Just seeing this case study seems like a lottery. One of the reasons I got into fastlane is to get away from the lottery mentality.
 

lewj24

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All value they provide is outside of their control it seems. Based on my research, it was just celebrities wearing it. Celebrities could have chosen any of the million of ecom fashion POD companies. Just seeing this case study seems like a lottery. One of the reasons I got into fastlane is to get away from the lottery mentality.
This is nothing like the lottery. Getting celebrities to endorse your brand is a normal marketing strategy that has proven very effective. More companies than you can count have done it. Don't see an issue here.
 
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MakeMoreMoves

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This is nothing like the lottery. Getting celebrities to endorse your brand is a normal marketing strategy that has proven very effective. More companies than you can count have done it. Don't see an issue here.
For regular people like me trying to go fastlane, I can afford a small influncer, sure. But someone that takes the from 0 to 100? Only celebrities in the ranks of the Rock, Kanye, Kim K, etc. have that power. My eyes are already rolling backwards to how much they will charge for brand deal.

How does a regular joe get them to wear it? Most of the time I would think of if it is a remarkable product and they encounter it I would have the chance of an organic post.

Th examples i showed, have zero remarkability. I think anyone can agree. They are T-Shirts
 

ApparentHorizon

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zero logic applies
Completely logical, and here's why...

1. It's counter culture. It's the "be different" of apparel. All while still fitting in within a social group.
- Anti social - it's a bad thing to be anti social according to society. Doing bad things is cool
- You could say being an Entrepreneur fits here too

2. It doesn't take itself seriously.
- Supreme, selling bricks with its logo on it. And then instantly selling out. WHAT LOL?
- Anti social - self deprecating humor - which has been linked to good psychological wellbeing

What these 2 points indicate is you're cool and fun to be around.

It still has to be pushed by marketing, and the goofy nature of it helps it get additional press.

But if you don't have the above points, it's just another brand.

It becomes less and less about the product.
Status symbol
 

lewj24

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For regular people like me trying to go fastlane
Just because you can't afford to hire a celeb doesn't make it a bad marketing strategy or like the lottery.

The clothing industry is literally all branding. No need to get upset about it. Create a brand.
 
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MakeMoreMoves

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Just because you can't afford to hire a celeb doesn't make it a bad marketing strategy or like the lottery.

The clothing industry is literally all branding. No need to get upset about it. Create a brand.
Well since most people here are just regulars trying to go fastlane, there has to be someway for a celebrity to wear it without that kind of money. I mean if I had the money to pay these guys, I wouldn’t even need to go fastlane. Something I can control is developing a remarkable product and let it spread organically, putting ads on a remarkable product is gasoline on a fire. But when I see these brand case studies this goes totally against developing a remarkable product. It proves that your product can be a zero and still make it.

I feel at total loss when I see these case studies. Makes me feel like I am completely wasting time. I have been spending a great deal of time developing a custom jacket and thinking of building a story and paying attention to detail (fit, anti corrosive metals, function, environmental friendliness) and making sure it reasonates with my target audience. I see a brand like ASSC and im like bruh...

Edit: the brand is literally, Kanye wore it. Guy had zero control over that. That’s why I say lottery still
 

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Thoelt53

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Say you’re a regular Joe. You build a clothing brand that donates a portion of proceeds to orphanages.

Let’s say The Rock is really into helping orphanages. He really likes what your brand is doing and find himself aligning with your brand’s mission statement.

The Rock wears your shirt and puts a video on Instagram repping your awesome brand and all the good you do for orphanages. People who follow The Rock who also want to help support orphanages buy your shirts.

This is only one hypothetical way of getting celebrity endorsement without buying them.
 
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lewj24

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Something I can control is developing a remarkable product and let it spread organically,
I don't believe there is such thing as a remarkable product in the clothing industry. They are all the same. The only difference is branding. If you don't want to brand a clothing company get out of the clothing industry. I think Daymond John said he has invested in over 14 clothing companies and only around 3 have been successful (including his original FUBU). How can a man with vast knowledge/capital/connections in this industry fail so many times? I believe it's because clothing is all about branding which is hard to control. He also got a celeb to endorse FUBU when he was starting out with low capital in his early days.

I mean if I had the money to pay these guys, I wouldn’t even need to go fastlane.
This statement is a paradox. You are saying that if you had enough money to afford a celeb you wouldn't need the celeb but you can't get enough money because you don't have a celeb. If this is the case then why do people use celebs to endorse products?

That’s why I say lottery still
It may be lucky but it is not a lottery. Luck from putting yourself out there and working hard on your business/brand isn't the same as a one in a hundred million chance of winning the lottery. The lottery has no effort, no control and near zero odds. Getting a celeb to advertise your brand is not the same. Whether you pay them or they like it so much they do it for free it is in your control.

Quick Google search says Supreme was founded in 1994.
Balenciaga was founded in 1919, almost 100 years ago.
Anthropologie was founded in 1992.

These people have been working hard building their businesses and brands for over 24 years and you call it a lottery? Disrespectful.
 

HugoMoreno

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Those brand get status by
affiliating themselves with high status
people and using high status tactics
(scarcity, high price points, etc)

And then sell the customer some of
this status via their products
 

Bearcorp

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OP, do you have a brand? Before thinking about how to afford to pay the Rock to wear something, focus on building a brand that people will like. Social proof doesn't just come from the biggest celebrity in the world rocking your gear, it also comes from regular people wearing it too. And If enough regular joes are wearing it, some of the celebrity influencers might come across it online, and they might even like it themselves, they are still people with their own tastes and preferences.
 

NadiaZ

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About the title of this thread: Stupid in the sense it becomes at the very far end of emotion, zero logic applies. I know that all or most buying is emotional though.

So I am very curious to how these brands do it.

Supreme, Balenciaga, Anti Social Social Club, maybe Anthropologie

It becomes less and less about the product.

It has pretty much hit the point that is doesn't even matter what these guys sell.

I mean I briefly looked at ASSC, and this guy seems to go against all fastlane logic about the customer. This guy for ASSC does terrible customer service .

It seems like this is the marketing plan to do this:

1) Build product, most of the time it is clothing

2) Hire bunch of papparazzi

3) Do anything it takes to get a huge celebrity to wear it in public

4) Massive Social Proof

Value provided is the huge personal satisfaction of getting to wear something a celebrity wears/approves of.

Sales like no other.
This reminds me of those sugar gummy bears for your hair that I see on every single Instagram influencer's page. I seriously wonder though whether the company is making tons of sales even though their advertising is really good.
 

NadiaZ

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All value they provide is outside of their control it seems. Based on my research, it was just celebrities wearing it. Celebrities could have chosen any of the million of ecom fashion POD companies. Just seeing this case study seems like a lottery. One of the reasons I got into fastlane is to get away from the lottery mentality.
You might think it's luck but I actually did some research on ASSC and I found out the guy who founded it, Neek Lurk, used to work at Stussy as a social media manager. He probably learned a lot about streetwear and learned a lot about Tumblr and how kids on there are like before he got big.

What seems like random luck sometimes may not be - we just don't get to see the "work" that's put into it.
 

Thoelt53

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I feel at total loss when I see these case studies. Makes me feel like I am completely wasting time. I have been spending a great deal of time developing a custom jacket and thinking of building a story and paying attention to detail (fit, anti corrosive metals, function, environmental friendliness) and making sure it reasonates with my target audience. I see a brand like ASSC and im like bruh...
Assuming you have validated your market, keep pressing forward with your venture. If you constantly focus on what your competition is doing today, while they're thinking about tomorrow, they're going to leave you in the dust while you chase them day in and day out.

Start innovating and trying to get ahead in your own space. Incessantly innovating is what will give you a competitive edge.

And not for nothing, it sounds like your target demographic is completely different than the ASSC's, so why worry about what they're doing?
 

Xeon

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Majority of all these clothing brands who eventually made it big all started with some sort of celebrity connections. Doesn't have to be a international celeb level, just a state-level or even city-level is good enough.

When FUBU started, Daymond John had connections with some rappers from what I know.
Johnny Cupcakes was a musician himself, some sort of small-town celeb.
CLOT (streetwear brand) was started by a Hong Kong celeb.
Stussy, in the beginning, the founder himself travelled to different parts of the world to build connections with well-known folks.

And while we're talking about streetwear brands, their designs are ugly as F*ck. I bet you all my Rep points here that anyone in this forum can come up with a better design than those crap.

Here's another streetwear brand: THE CHINATOWN MARKET

Look at their designs. Does your eyes bleed? Does it look like the work of some 9 year old who uses Microsoft Paint for the first time? Heck, even some 9 year olds can do better than that.

Either the world's population love to wear ugly crap like these (fetish for uglifying oneself?), or humans' average intelligence must be lower than scientists thought.

Queuing up for days for Supreme's "drops". LOL
These are just Gildan tshirts with low quality printing, guys.
Want a Supreme shirt? Get into Photoshop, place Futura Heavy Oblique font on a red rectangle, save as PNG/vector file, send to those online t-shirt printers to print, and viola! You are now a proud owner of a Supreme tshirt without needing to pay $$$$ and queue!

Anyone who wants to start a streetwear brand, post here. I'll throw out free designs if I'm free. I'll make sure the designs look "better" than these clowns.

Let's not talk about ASSC. Jesus man.
Balenciaga? Their shoes look even uglier than those made-in-China cheap shoes sold in neighbourhood stores here.
 
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MiLeung

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I'm actually starting a brand right now lol. Anyone know a good way of getting famous people to wear your stuff?
 

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jpn

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I'm actually starting a brand right now lol. Anyone know a good way of getting famous people to wear your stuff?
Have you considered paying them? They render a service to you (showing your product to your customer base) and you pay them for it?
 

MiLeung

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Have you considered paying them? They render a service to you (showing your product to your customer base) and you pay them for it?
Yeah, that's probably the easiest option, but I don't think brands like Supreme pay celebs to wear their stuff though or maybe free merch is the payment.
 

Xolorr

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Bad or Genius?

The guy who started ASSC had worked in Stussy for "nearly a decade".
10 years of a job. I heard in a video about him that it was 12 years, but that doesn't sound right. Anyways, that's a lot of industry knowledge, and he was in the marketing department.

This is what I picked up from what he did:

1. Zoned in on the Tumblr "grunge" culture which he knew very well. One scroll through a trendy account on Tumblr shows a bunch of GIFs and photos with eerily similar styling to the ASSC logo & designs.

2. Built a product around what his target market resonated with. This dude knows the streetwear industry inside out. Not because he got lucky, because he put 8+ years into researching it. Who was the target market? 16-year-old Sally who thinks her parents are stupid and controlling and spends all her free time smoking weed, going to house parties, and posting about how bad her life is because it is what's perceived as cool. But hey, she looks hella good in those Nike airs on her Instagram.

4. He put the product on all his friends and connects he made through his time in the industry. Everyone under him at Stussy would've had a huge social influence. You don't get into Stussy without being a "Hypebeast" of sorts. If your marketing manager came to you and offered you free clothes or even money to post about it, you definitely would. Same goes for his friends / connects. I don't know how Kanye got on it, but I bet he wasn't the first to rep it, that would've been once it gained momentum.

5. He built a "brand" around this. Why does the brand work so well without an about us page, crappy designs, etc? Because it's exactly what Sally wants. No about us page? Makes it damn mysterious. WHY is this person on Insta with 100k followers wearing this brand, and I can't find out anything about it?? Think copywriting. He created tension and mystery. In this case, NO copy was the best copy. So Sally hits the ASSC page, and can't find anything about the brand, except that EVERYTHING is sold out.
I highly doubt it's all sound out. All these brands artificially hold back supply to up the price. I bet half those designs aren't even real pieces, just photoshopped pictures listed as products which are "sold out". What's happening in Sally's head? I NEED THIS. Why? Because she can't get it. It's blowing up on social media and is becoming a sensation, and she just can't find it anywhere. (if you observe the streetwear scene, this is where resellers come in.) It's a weird psychology, humans are weird I guess, but because she can't get it, she wants it more.

(This is seen a lot in dating, hot girls have guys throwing themselves at them all the time. As soon as she's slightly interested in a guy and he doesn't reciprocate, it flicks a switch and makes them want them even more, and vice versa with guys to girls.)

Cool, so now Sally reaaaally wants it, so that she can show her friends and up her social status. What does she do? Follow ASSC on every form of social media possible, so that she knows exactly when the next "drop" is, so that she can pay $90 for a hoodie.

At least this is my thoughts on it.
 

Xeon

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Bad or Genius?

The guy who started ASSC had worked in Stussy for "nearly a decade".
10 years of a job. I heard in a video about him that it was 12 years, but that doesn't sound right. Anyways, that's a lot of industry knowledge, and he was in the marketing department.

This is what I picked up from what he did:

1. Zoned in on the Tumblr "grunge" culture which he knew very well. One scroll through a trendy account on Tumblr shows a bunch of GIFs and photos with eerily similar styling to the ASSC logo & designs.

2. Built a product around what his target market resonated with. This dude knows the streetwear industry inside out. Not because he got lucky, because he put 8+ years into researching it. Who was the target market? 16-year-old Sally who thinks her parents are stupid and controlling and spends all her free time smoking weed, going to house parties, and posting about how bad her life is because it is what's perceived as cool. But hey, she looks hella good in those Nike airs on her Instagram.

4. He put the product on all his friends and connects he made through his time in the industry. Everyone under him at Stussy would've had a huge social influence. You don't get into Stussy without being a "Hypebeast" of sorts. If your marketing manager came to you and offered you free clothes or even money to post about it, you definitely would. Same goes for his friends / connects. I don't know how Kanye got on it, but I bet he wasn't the first to rep it, that would've been once it gained momentum.

5. He built a "brand" around this. Why does the brand work so well without an about us page, crappy designs, etc? Because it's exactly what Sally wants. No about us page? Makes it damn mysterious. WHY is this person on Insta with 100k followers wearing this brand, and I can't find out anything about it?? Think copywriting. He created tension and mystery. In this case, NO copy was the best copy. So Sally hits the ASSC page, and can't find anything about the brand, except that EVERYTHING is sold out.
I highly doubt it's all sound out. All these brands artificially hold back supply to up the price. I bet half those designs aren't even real pieces, just photoshopped pictures listed as products which are "sold out". What's happening in Sally's head? I NEED THIS. Why? Because she can't get it. It's blowing up on social media and is becoming a sensation, and she just can't find it anywhere. (if you observe the streetwear scene, this is where resellers come in.) It's a weird psychology, humans are weird I guess, but because she can't get it, she wants it more.

(This is seen a lot in dating, hot girls have guys throwing themselves at them all the time. As soon as she's slightly interested in a guy and he doesn't reciprocate, it flicks a switch and makes them want them even more, and vice versa with guys to girls.)

Cool, so now Sally reaaaally wants it, so that she can show her friends and up her social status. What does she do? Follow ASSC on every form of social media possible, so that she knows exactly when the next "drop" is, so that she can pay $90 for a hoodie.

At least this is my thoughts on it.
Impressive post, bookmarked!

I bet half those designs aren't even real pieces, just photoshopped pictures listed as products which are "sold out"
I KNOW WHAT TO DO NOW. :devil:
 

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